Iatrogenic contamination of multidose vials in simulated use

A reassessment of current patient injection technique

R. T. Plott, Richard Wagner, S. K. Tyring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An investigation of the potential spread of iatrogenic infections through contaminated multidose vials was performed. Contamination of a multidose vial was hypothesized to occur after a single syringe is used to inject an infected patient with medication, and the same syringe subsequently is used to withdraw additional medication from the multidose vial. If the contaminated multidose vial is used for another patient, an iatrogenic infection may be spread. Laboratory study of this injection technique found that viral plaque-forming units could be transmitted to a multidose vial in this manner. A survey of 100 fellows of the American Academy of Dermatology from the United States found that 24% of the respondents used this potentially unsafe procedure. The potential for iatrogenic spread of the human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus is described. Recommendations to avoid patient infection are made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1441-1444
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume126
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

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Syringes
Injections
Infection
Hepatitis B virus
HIV
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Iatrogenic contamination of multidose vials in simulated use : A reassessment of current patient injection technique. / Plott, R. T.; Wagner, Richard; Tyring, S. K.

In: Archives of Dermatology, Vol. 126, No. 11, 1990, p. 1441-1444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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