Identifying body fluid distribution by measuring electrical impedance

M. R. Scheltinga, D. O. Jacobs, Thomas Kimbrough, D. W. Wilmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of critical illness on extracellular water (ECW) and total body water (TBW) were measured using (1) a multiple dilutional technique, and (2) whole body and regional bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in a group of stable patients. Total body water and body resistance (R) were similar in patients when compared with normal healthy subjects (TBW: 45.1 ± 4.5 vs. 46.2 ± 3.4 L, p = 0.85; R: 518 ± 42 vs. 500 ± 22Ω, p = 0.70), and a significant relationship was present between these measurements (r = -0.87, p < 0.001). However, patients demonstrated an increase in ECW compared with controls (ECW: 18.6 ± 1.3 vs. 14.7 ± 1.1 L, p < 0.05). Expanded ECW values were associated with diminished electrical reactance (X(c)) values (38 ± 6 vs. 70 ± 4 Ω, p < 0.001) and these values were correlated (r = -0.67, p < 0.005). The ratio of X(c) to R determined across the body and each of the segments was significantly lower in patients compared with controls (at least p < 0.005) and this ratio measured across a leg was the most sensitive predictor of health (X(c)/R ≥ 0.137) and disease (X(c)/R ≤ 0.101). Bioelectrical impedance analysis is a noninvasive and simple bedside technique that can be used to predict TBW and identify altered fluid distribution following critical illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-670
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume33
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Body Water
Body Fluids
Electric Impedance
Water
Critical Illness
Leg
Healthy Volunteers
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Scheltinga, M. R., Jacobs, D. O., Kimbrough, T., & Wilmore, D. W. (1992). Identifying body fluid distribution by measuring electrical impedance. Journal of Trauma, 33(5), 665-670.

Identifying body fluid distribution by measuring electrical impedance. / Scheltinga, M. R.; Jacobs, D. O.; Kimbrough, Thomas; Wilmore, D. W.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 33, No. 5, 1992, p. 665-670.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scheltinga, MR, Jacobs, DO, Kimbrough, T & Wilmore, DW 1992, 'Identifying body fluid distribution by measuring electrical impedance', Journal of Trauma, vol. 33, no. 5, pp. 665-670.
Scheltinga MR, Jacobs DO, Kimbrough T, Wilmore DW. Identifying body fluid distribution by measuring electrical impedance. Journal of Trauma. 1992;33(5):665-670.
Scheltinga, M. R. ; Jacobs, D. O. ; Kimbrough, Thomas ; Wilmore, D. W. / Identifying body fluid distribution by measuring electrical impedance. In: Journal of Trauma. 1992 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 665-670.
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