Immediate and long-term psychological problems for survivors of severe pediatric electrical injury

Marta Rosenberg, Neha Mehta, Laura Rosenberg, Maribel Ramirez, Walter J. Meyer, David N. Herndon, Clark R. Andersen, Christopher Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To compare psychological difficulties experienced during the initial acute hospitalization and the last follow up visit for children with electrical injuries (EI) and children without electrical injuries (non-EI). We hypothesized that children with electrical burns would have different psychological outcomes. Methods This retrospective study compared emotional and cognitive functioning of EI patients and a matched group of survivors of other burns. Results Medical records of 67 patients with and without EI were reviewed. For the EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.6 ± 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 15.5 ± 4.6 years, and mean TBSA 32 ± 21%. For the Non-EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.4 ± 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 14.5 ± 4.7 years, and mean TBSA 32 ± 21.5%. During the acute hospitalization, a significant difference was found between the groups in the area of neuropathic pain (Chi-square tests p < 0.011). Individuals with EI were more likely to have acute stress disorder/post-traumatic stress disorder as well as amnesia of the accident than the controls; however, this did not reach statistical significance. No differences were found between the groups in other psychological areas. Follow up information from the last documented psychology/psychiatric visit revealed an equal number of patients experienced anxiety disorders, depression, grief, behavioral problems, and cognitive difficulties. Conclusions Some differences were evident between the groups immediately after injury; however, long term outcomes were similar.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1823-1830
Number of pages8
JournalBurns
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Affective
  • Cognitive
  • Electrical injury
  • Pediatric
  • Psychological outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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