Immediate and long-term psychological problems for survivors of severe pediatric electrical injury

Marta Rosenberg, Neha Mehta, Laura Rosenberg, Maribel Ramirez, Walter Meyer, David Herndon, Clark R. Andersen, Christopher Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To compare psychological difficulties experienced during the initial acute hospitalization and the last follow up visit for children with electrical injuries (EI) and children without electrical injuries (non-EI). We hypothesized that children with electrical burns would have different psychological outcomes. Methods: This retrospective study compared emotional and cognitive functioning of EI patients and a matched group of survivors of other burns. Results: Medical records of 67 patients with and without EI were reviewed. For the EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.6. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 15.5. ±. 4.6 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21%. For the Non-EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.4. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 14.5. ±. 4.7 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21.5%. During the acute hospitalization, a significant difference was found between the groups in the area of neuropathic pain (Chi-square tests p <. 0.011). Individuals with EI were more likely to have acute stress disorder/post-traumatic stress disorder as well as amnesia of the accident than the controls; however, this did not reach statistical significance. No differences were found between the groups in other psychological areas. Follow up information from the last documented psychology/psychiatric visit revealed an equal number of patients experienced anxiety disorders, depression, grief, behavioral problems, and cognitive difficulties. Conclusions: Some differences were evident between the groups immediately after injury; however, long term outcomes were similar.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBurns
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2015

Fingerprint

Survivors
Pediatrics
Psychology
Wounds and Injuries
Burns
Hospitalization
Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute
Grief
Amnesia
Neuralgia
Chi-Square Distribution
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Anxiety Disorders
Accidents
Medical Records
Psychiatry
Research Design
Retrospective Studies
Depression

Keywords

  • Affective
  • Cognitive
  • Electrical injury
  • Pediatric
  • Psychological outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Immediate and long-term psychological problems for survivors of severe pediatric electrical injury. / Rosenberg, Marta; Mehta, Neha; Rosenberg, Laura; Ramirez, Maribel; Meyer, Walter; Herndon, David; Andersen, Clark R.; Thomas, Christopher.

In: Burns, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rosenberg, Marta ; Mehta, Neha ; Rosenberg, Laura ; Ramirez, Maribel ; Meyer, Walter ; Herndon, David ; Andersen, Clark R. ; Thomas, Christopher. / Immediate and long-term psychological problems for survivors of severe pediatric electrical injury. In: Burns. 2015.
@article{80ed9e9998c540b7b63408a38fd2c5bc,
title = "Immediate and long-term psychological problems for survivors of severe pediatric electrical injury",
abstract = "Objective: To compare psychological difficulties experienced during the initial acute hospitalization and the last follow up visit for children with electrical injuries (EI) and children without electrical injuries (non-EI). We hypothesized that children with electrical burns would have different psychological outcomes. Methods: This retrospective study compared emotional and cognitive functioning of EI patients and a matched group of survivors of other burns. Results: Medical records of 67 patients with and without EI were reviewed. For the EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.6. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 15.5. ±. 4.6 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21{\%}. For the Non-EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.4. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 14.5. ±. 4.7 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21.5{\%}. During the acute hospitalization, a significant difference was found between the groups in the area of neuropathic pain (Chi-square tests p <. 0.011). Individuals with EI were more likely to have acute stress disorder/post-traumatic stress disorder as well as amnesia of the accident than the controls; however, this did not reach statistical significance. No differences were found between the groups in other psychological areas. Follow up information from the last documented psychology/psychiatric visit revealed an equal number of patients experienced anxiety disorders, depression, grief, behavioral problems, and cognitive difficulties. Conclusions: Some differences were evident between the groups immediately after injury; however, long term outcomes were similar.",
keywords = "Affective, Cognitive, Electrical injury, Pediatric, Psychological outcome",
author = "Marta Rosenberg and Neha Mehta and Laura Rosenberg and Maribel Ramirez and Walter Meyer and David Herndon and Andersen, {Clark R.} and Christopher Thomas",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.burns.2015.06.006",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Burns",
issn = "0305-4179",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Immediate and long-term psychological problems for survivors of severe pediatric electrical injury

AU - Rosenberg, Marta

AU - Mehta, Neha

AU - Rosenberg, Laura

AU - Ramirez, Maribel

AU - Meyer, Walter

AU - Herndon, David

AU - Andersen, Clark R.

AU - Thomas, Christopher

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Objective: To compare psychological difficulties experienced during the initial acute hospitalization and the last follow up visit for children with electrical injuries (EI) and children without electrical injuries (non-EI). We hypothesized that children with electrical burns would have different psychological outcomes. Methods: This retrospective study compared emotional and cognitive functioning of EI patients and a matched group of survivors of other burns. Results: Medical records of 67 patients with and without EI were reviewed. For the EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.6. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 15.5. ±. 4.6 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21%. For the Non-EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.4. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 14.5. ±. 4.7 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21.5%. During the acute hospitalization, a significant difference was found between the groups in the area of neuropathic pain (Chi-square tests p <. 0.011). Individuals with EI were more likely to have acute stress disorder/post-traumatic stress disorder as well as amnesia of the accident than the controls; however, this did not reach statistical significance. No differences were found between the groups in other psychological areas. Follow up information from the last documented psychology/psychiatric visit revealed an equal number of patients experienced anxiety disorders, depression, grief, behavioral problems, and cognitive difficulties. Conclusions: Some differences were evident between the groups immediately after injury; however, long term outcomes were similar.

AB - Objective: To compare psychological difficulties experienced during the initial acute hospitalization and the last follow up visit for children with electrical injuries (EI) and children without electrical injuries (non-EI). We hypothesized that children with electrical burns would have different psychological outcomes. Methods: This retrospective study compared emotional and cognitive functioning of EI patients and a matched group of survivors of other burns. Results: Medical records of 67 patients with and without EI were reviewed. For the EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.6. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 15.5. ±. 4.6 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21%. For the Non-EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.4. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 14.5. ±. 4.7 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21.5%. During the acute hospitalization, a significant difference was found between the groups in the area of neuropathic pain (Chi-square tests p <. 0.011). Individuals with EI were more likely to have acute stress disorder/post-traumatic stress disorder as well as amnesia of the accident than the controls; however, this did not reach statistical significance. No differences were found between the groups in other psychological areas. Follow up information from the last documented psychology/psychiatric visit revealed an equal number of patients experienced anxiety disorders, depression, grief, behavioral problems, and cognitive difficulties. Conclusions: Some differences were evident between the groups immediately after injury; however, long term outcomes were similar.

KW - Affective

KW - Cognitive

KW - Electrical injury

KW - Pediatric

KW - Psychological outcome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84936971806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84936971806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.burns.2015.06.006

DO - 10.1016/j.burns.2015.06.006

M3 - Article

JO - Burns

JF - Burns

SN - 0305-4179

ER -