Immediate and long-term psychological problems for survivors of severe pediatric electrical injury

Marta Rosenberg, Neha Mehta, Laura Rosenberg, Maribel Ramirez, Walter Meyer, David Herndon, Clark R. Andersen, Christopher Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To compare psychological difficulties experienced during the initial acute hospitalization and the last follow up visit for children with electrical injuries (EI) and children without electrical injuries (non-EI). We hypothesized that children with electrical burns would have different psychological outcomes. Methods: This retrospective study compared emotional and cognitive functioning of EI patients and a matched group of survivors of other burns. Results: Medical records of 67 patients with and without EI were reviewed. For the EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.6. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 15.5. ±. 4.6 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21%. For the Non-EI group, the mean age at injury was 12.4. ±. 3.9 years, the mean age at follow up was 14.5. ±. 4.7 years, and mean TBSA 32. ±. 21.5%. During the acute hospitalization, a significant difference was found between the groups in the area of neuropathic pain (Chi-square tests p <. 0.011). Individuals with EI were more likely to have acute stress disorder/post-traumatic stress disorder as well as amnesia of the accident than the controls; however, this did not reach statistical significance. No differences were found between the groups in other psychological areas. Follow up information from the last documented psychology/psychiatric visit revealed an equal number of patients experienced anxiety disorders, depression, grief, behavioral problems, and cognitive difficulties. Conclusions: Some differences were evident between the groups immediately after injury; however, long term outcomes were similar.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBurns
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2015

Keywords

  • Affective
  • Cognitive
  • Electrical injury
  • Pediatric
  • Psychological outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Surgery

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    Rosenberg, M., Mehta, N., Rosenberg, L., Ramirez, M., Meyer, W., Herndon, D., Andersen, C. R., & Thomas, C. (Accepted/In press). Immediate and long-term psychological problems for survivors of severe pediatric electrical injury. Burns. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2015.06.006