Impact of new therapeutics for hepatitis C virus infection in incarcerated populations

Anne C. Spaulding, Arthur Y. Kim, Amy Jo Harzke, Jean C. Sullivan, Benjamin P. Linas, Arthur Brewer, Jeff Dickert, Barbara H. McGovern, Lara B. Strick, Robert Trestman, Warren J. Ferguson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    29 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Inmate populations bear a disproportionate share of the burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. With more than 90% of prisoners released back to their communities within a few years of sentencing, incarceration can be viewed as an opportunity to provide HCV screening and therapeutic interventions to benefit the individual, reduce the costs of HCV management to the health care system from a societal perspective, and improve overall public health. Although optimal medical management of HCV within prison settings would increase the current cost of correctional health care, it could decrease transmission within the community, reduce overall disease burden, and lower the future societal health care costs associated with end-stage liver disease. Nonetheless, most prison systems treat only a small fraction of infected inmates. Current and emerging therapeutic agents will cure HCV infection in the vast majority of patients. Mathematical modeling also shows that expanded HCV screening and treatment are cost-effective from the societal perspective. In this article, we will describe appropriate treatment regimens, propose strategies to lessen the burden of these costly HCV therapies on correctional health care systems, and address the challenges of expanded HCV screening in correctional settings.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)27-35
    Number of pages9
    JournalTopics in antiviral medicine
    Volume21
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - Feb 2013

    Fingerprint

    Virus Diseases
    Hepacivirus
    Population
    Health Care Costs
    Prisons
    Therapeutics
    Delivery of Health Care
    Prisoners
    End Stage Liver Disease
    Public Health
    Costs and Cost Analysis

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Infectious Diseases
    • Pharmacology (medical)
    • Pharmacology
    • Virology

    Cite this

    Spaulding, A. C., Kim, A. Y., Jo Harzke, A., Sullivan, J. C., Linas, B. P., Brewer, A., ... Ferguson, W. J. (2013). Impact of new therapeutics for hepatitis C virus infection in incarcerated populations. Topics in antiviral medicine, 21(1), 27-35.

    Impact of new therapeutics for hepatitis C virus infection in incarcerated populations. / Spaulding, Anne C.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Jo Harzke, Amy; Sullivan, Jean C.; Linas, Benjamin P.; Brewer, Arthur; Dickert, Jeff; McGovern, Barbara H.; Strick, Lara B.; Trestman, Robert; Ferguson, Warren J.

    In: Topics in antiviral medicine, Vol. 21, No. 1, 02.2013, p. 27-35.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Spaulding, AC, Kim, AY, Jo Harzke, A, Sullivan, JC, Linas, BP, Brewer, A, Dickert, J, McGovern, BH, Strick, LB, Trestman, R & Ferguson, WJ 2013, 'Impact of new therapeutics for hepatitis C virus infection in incarcerated populations', Topics in antiviral medicine, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 27-35.
    Spaulding AC, Kim AY, Jo Harzke A, Sullivan JC, Linas BP, Brewer A et al. Impact of new therapeutics for hepatitis C virus infection in incarcerated populations. Topics in antiviral medicine. 2013 Feb;21(1):27-35.
    Spaulding, Anne C. ; Kim, Arthur Y. ; Jo Harzke, Amy ; Sullivan, Jean C. ; Linas, Benjamin P. ; Brewer, Arthur ; Dickert, Jeff ; McGovern, Barbara H. ; Strick, Lara B. ; Trestman, Robert ; Ferguson, Warren J. / Impact of new therapeutics for hepatitis C virus infection in incarcerated populations. In: Topics in antiviral medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 27-35.
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