Impact of obesity on body image dissatisfaction and social integration difficulty in adolescent and young adult burn injury survivors

Maria Chondronikola, Labros S. Sidossis, Lisa M. Richardson, Jeffrey Temple, Patricia A. Van Den Berg, David Herndon, Walter Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Burn injury deformities and obesity have been associated with social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction. However, the combined effects of obesity and burn injury on social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction are unknown. Adolescent and young adult burn injury survivors were categorized as normal weight (n = 47) or overweight and obese (n = 21). Burn-related and anthropometric information were obtained from patients' medical records, and validated questionnaires were used to assess the main outcomes and possible confounders. Analysis of covariance and multiple linear regressions were performed to evaluate the objectives of this study. Obese and overweight burn injury survivors did not experience increased body image dissatisfaction (12 ± 4.3 vs 13.1 ± 4.4; P = .57) or social integration difficulty (17.5 ± 6.9 vs 15.5 ± 5.7; P = .16) compared with normal weight burn injury survivors. Weight status was not a significant predictor of social integration difficulty or body image dissatisfaction (P = .19 and P = .24, respectively). However, mobility limitations predicted greater social integration difficulty (P = .005) and body image dissatisfaction (P < .001), whereas higher weight status at burn was a borderline significant predictor of body image dissatisfaction (P = .05). Obese and overweight adolescents and young adults, who sustained major burn injury as children, do not experience greater social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction compared with normal weight burn injury survivors. Mobility limitations and higher weight status at burn are likely more important factors affecting the long-term social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction of these young people.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-108
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Research
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

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Body Image
Survivors
Young Adult
Obesity
Wounds and Injuries
Weights and Measures
Mobility Limitation
Burns
Medical Records
Linear Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Surgery

Cite this

Impact of obesity on body image dissatisfaction and social integration difficulty in adolescent and young adult burn injury survivors. / Chondronikola, Maria; Sidossis, Labros S.; Richardson, Lisa M.; Temple, Jeffrey; Van Den Berg, Patricia A.; Herndon, David; Meyer, Walter.

In: Journal of Burn Care and Research, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 102-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chondronikola, Maria ; Sidossis, Labros S. ; Richardson, Lisa M. ; Temple, Jeffrey ; Van Den Berg, Patricia A. ; Herndon, David ; Meyer, Walter. / Impact of obesity on body image dissatisfaction and social integration difficulty in adolescent and young adult burn injury survivors. In: Journal of Burn Care and Research. 2013 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 102-108.
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