Impact of pre-injury family functioning and resources on self-reported post-concussive symptoms and functional outcomes in persons with mild TBI

Jessica Lynn Temple, Margaret A. Struchen, Monique Pappadis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study investigates the contribution of pre-injury family functioning and resources on self-reported post-concussive symptoms and functional outcomes in persons with mild TBI (mTBI). Design: Participants with uncomplicated or complicated mTBIs were recruited from consecutive admissions to the emergency department of a level 1 trauma centre. Patients completed baseline assessments within 2 weeks of injury and an outcomes assessment at 3 months post-injury. Methods and procedures: One hundred and sixty-six adults with mTBI were included. Baseline measures of pre-injury history, family functioning and resources were obtained. Functional status assessments and self-reported measures of health, common TBI symptoms and psychological problems were administered at 3-months post-injury. Results: Data reduction of outcome measures using principle components analysis revealed two factors: self-reported post-concussive symptoms and current functional/participation status, explaining 60.53% of the variance. Family resources (β = –0.239, t(150) = –2.84, p = 0.005) and age (β = –0.170, t(150) = –2.19, p = 0.030), but not family functioning, were significant predictors of self-reported post-concussive symptoms at follow-up, R2 = 0.051, F(5, 150) = 4.09, p = 0.002. Neither family resources nor functioning predicted current functional/participation status. Conclusions: Fewer family resources and younger age were associated with increased self-reported post-concussive symptoms. Fewer resources may be a potential risk factor to heightened perception of post-concussive symptoms. Providing low-cost counselling or resource facilitation services may improve outcomes for those with limited resources after mTBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1672-1682
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Injury
Volume30
Issue number13-14
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2016

Fingerprint

Post-Concussion Syndrome
Wounds and Injuries
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Trauma Centers
Resources
Family Functioning
Person
Hospital Emergency Service
Counseling
Psychology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health

Keywords

  • family functioning
  • family resources
  • functional status
  • Mild TBI
  • postconcussive symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Impact of pre-injury family functioning and resources on self-reported post-concussive symptoms and functional outcomes in persons with mild TBI. / Temple, Jessica Lynn; Struchen, Margaret A.; Pappadis, Monique.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 30, No. 13-14, 05.12.2016, p. 1672-1682.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d81f5b9eefa24626a90d25b6d98a1536,
title = "Impact of pre-injury family functioning and resources on self-reported post-concussive symptoms and functional outcomes in persons with mild TBI",
abstract = "Objective: This study investigates the contribution of pre-injury family functioning and resources on self-reported post-concussive symptoms and functional outcomes in persons with mild TBI (mTBI). Design: Participants with uncomplicated or complicated mTBIs were recruited from consecutive admissions to the emergency department of a level 1 trauma centre. Patients completed baseline assessments within 2 weeks of injury and an outcomes assessment at 3 months post-injury. Methods and procedures: One hundred and sixty-six adults with mTBI were included. Baseline measures of pre-injury history, family functioning and resources were obtained. Functional status assessments and self-reported measures of health, common TBI symptoms and psychological problems were administered at 3-months post-injury. Results: Data reduction of outcome measures using principle components analysis revealed two factors: self-reported post-concussive symptoms and current functional/participation status, explaining 60.53{\%} of the variance. Family resources (β = –0.239, t(150) = –2.84, p = 0.005) and age (β = –0.170, t(150) = –2.19, p = 0.030), but not family functioning, were significant predictors of self-reported post-concussive symptoms at follow-up, R2 = 0.051, F(5, 150) = 4.09, p = 0.002. Neither family resources nor functioning predicted current functional/participation status. Conclusions: Fewer family resources and younger age were associated with increased self-reported post-concussive symptoms. Fewer resources may be a potential risk factor to heightened perception of post-concussive symptoms. Providing low-cost counselling or resource facilitation services may improve outcomes for those with limited resources after mTBI.",
keywords = "family functioning, family resources, functional status, Mild TBI, postconcussive symptoms",
author = "Temple, {Jessica Lynn} and Struchen, {Margaret A.} and Monique Pappadis",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "5",
doi = "10.3109/02699052.2015.1113561",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "1672--1682",
journal = "Brain Injury",
issn = "0269-9052",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "13-14",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of pre-injury family functioning and resources on self-reported post-concussive symptoms and functional outcomes in persons with mild TBI

AU - Temple, Jessica Lynn

AU - Struchen, Margaret A.

AU - Pappadis, Monique

PY - 2016/12/5

Y1 - 2016/12/5

N2 - Objective: This study investigates the contribution of pre-injury family functioning and resources on self-reported post-concussive symptoms and functional outcomes in persons with mild TBI (mTBI). Design: Participants with uncomplicated or complicated mTBIs were recruited from consecutive admissions to the emergency department of a level 1 trauma centre. Patients completed baseline assessments within 2 weeks of injury and an outcomes assessment at 3 months post-injury. Methods and procedures: One hundred and sixty-six adults with mTBI were included. Baseline measures of pre-injury history, family functioning and resources were obtained. Functional status assessments and self-reported measures of health, common TBI symptoms and psychological problems were administered at 3-months post-injury. Results: Data reduction of outcome measures using principle components analysis revealed two factors: self-reported post-concussive symptoms and current functional/participation status, explaining 60.53% of the variance. Family resources (β = –0.239, t(150) = –2.84, p = 0.005) and age (β = –0.170, t(150) = –2.19, p = 0.030), but not family functioning, were significant predictors of self-reported post-concussive symptoms at follow-up, R2 = 0.051, F(5, 150) = 4.09, p = 0.002. Neither family resources nor functioning predicted current functional/participation status. Conclusions: Fewer family resources and younger age were associated with increased self-reported post-concussive symptoms. Fewer resources may be a potential risk factor to heightened perception of post-concussive symptoms. Providing low-cost counselling or resource facilitation services may improve outcomes for those with limited resources after mTBI.

AB - Objective: This study investigates the contribution of pre-injury family functioning and resources on self-reported post-concussive symptoms and functional outcomes in persons with mild TBI (mTBI). Design: Participants with uncomplicated or complicated mTBIs were recruited from consecutive admissions to the emergency department of a level 1 trauma centre. Patients completed baseline assessments within 2 weeks of injury and an outcomes assessment at 3 months post-injury. Methods and procedures: One hundred and sixty-six adults with mTBI were included. Baseline measures of pre-injury history, family functioning and resources were obtained. Functional status assessments and self-reported measures of health, common TBI symptoms and psychological problems were administered at 3-months post-injury. Results: Data reduction of outcome measures using principle components analysis revealed two factors: self-reported post-concussive symptoms and current functional/participation status, explaining 60.53% of the variance. Family resources (β = –0.239, t(150) = –2.84, p = 0.005) and age (β = –0.170, t(150) = –2.19, p = 0.030), but not family functioning, were significant predictors of self-reported post-concussive symptoms at follow-up, R2 = 0.051, F(5, 150) = 4.09, p = 0.002. Neither family resources nor functioning predicted current functional/participation status. Conclusions: Fewer family resources and younger age were associated with increased self-reported post-concussive symptoms. Fewer resources may be a potential risk factor to heightened perception of post-concussive symptoms. Providing low-cost counselling or resource facilitation services may improve outcomes for those with limited resources after mTBI.

KW - family functioning

KW - family resources

KW - functional status

KW - Mild TBI

KW - postconcussive symptoms

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84990943254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84990943254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/02699052.2015.1113561

DO - 10.3109/02699052.2015.1113561

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 1672

EP - 1682

JO - Brain Injury

JF - Brain Injury

SN - 0269-9052

IS - 13-14

ER -