Impact of urine drug screening on no shows and dropouts among chronic pain patients: A propensity-matched cohort study

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in both the prescription of opioids for managing chronic pain, and an increase in opioid-related deaths in the US. Urine drug screening (UDS) is the de facto monitoring tool aimed at detecting and deterring opioid misuse. Objective: We study whether administering UDS on pain patients influences post-screening behavior of no-shows and dropouts. Study Design: Observational cohort study of electronic medical records. Setting: Single urban academic pain-clinic. Methods: A retrospective cohort comparison of patients receiving UDS versus those not receiving UDS was conducted on the entire sample as well as in the propensity score-matched samples in which matching was based on age, gender, pain-score, procedure-scheduled, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), pulse, temperature, physician ID, year of visit, psychology referral, and opioid prescription in the first visit. In addition, we conducted within-subjects logistic-regression to study no-shows and non-proportional hazards survival modeling to study dropout. Results: Analyses of 4,448 clinic visits by 723 pain patients indicated that UDS exposure in the first visit is associated with increased risk of no-show in the second visit (OR = 2.73, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-100
Number of pages12
JournalPain Physician
Volume19
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Preclinical Drug Evaluations
Chronic Pain
Cohort Studies
Opioid Analgesics
Urine
Pain
Prescriptions
Blood Pressure
Pain Clinics
Propensity Score
Electronic Health Records
Ambulatory Care
Observational Studies
Referral and Consultation
Logistic Models
Psychology
Physicians
Temperature
Survival

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Chronic pain
  • Dropout
  • No-show
  • Opioid monitoring
  • Propensity-score matching
  • UDS
  • Urine-drug screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Impact of urine drug screening on no shows and dropouts among chronic pain patients: A propensity-matched cohort study",
abstract = "Background: The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in both the prescription of opioids for managing chronic pain, and an increase in opioid-related deaths in the US. Urine drug screening (UDS) is the de facto monitoring tool aimed at detecting and deterring opioid misuse. Objective: We study whether administering UDS on pain patients influences post-screening behavior of no-shows and dropouts. Study Design: Observational cohort study of electronic medical records. Setting: Single urban academic pain-clinic. Methods: A retrospective cohort comparison of patients receiving UDS versus those not receiving UDS was conducted on the entire sample as well as in the propensity score-matched samples in which matching was based on age, gender, pain-score, procedure-scheduled, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), pulse, temperature, physician ID, year of visit, psychology referral, and opioid prescription in the first visit. In addition, we conducted within-subjects logistic-regression to study no-shows and non-proportional hazards survival modeling to study dropout. Results: Analyses of 4,448 clinic visits by 723 pain patients indicated that UDS exposure in the first visit is associated with increased risk of no-show in the second visit (OR = 2.73, P",
keywords = "Adherence, Chronic pain, Dropout, No-show, Opioid monitoring, Propensity-score matching, UDS, Urine-drug screening",
author = "Parthasarathy Krishnamurthy and Ranganathan Govindaraj and Courtney Williams and Gulshan Doulatram",
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T1 - Impact of urine drug screening on no shows and dropouts among chronic pain patients

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AU - Krishnamurthy, Parthasarathy

AU - Govindaraj, Ranganathan

AU - Williams, Courtney

AU - Doulatram, Gulshan

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N2 - Background: The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in both the prescription of opioids for managing chronic pain, and an increase in opioid-related deaths in the US. Urine drug screening (UDS) is the de facto monitoring tool aimed at detecting and deterring opioid misuse. Objective: We study whether administering UDS on pain patients influences post-screening behavior of no-shows and dropouts. Study Design: Observational cohort study of electronic medical records. Setting: Single urban academic pain-clinic. Methods: A retrospective cohort comparison of patients receiving UDS versus those not receiving UDS was conducted on the entire sample as well as in the propensity score-matched samples in which matching was based on age, gender, pain-score, procedure-scheduled, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), pulse, temperature, physician ID, year of visit, psychology referral, and opioid prescription in the first visit. In addition, we conducted within-subjects logistic-regression to study no-shows and non-proportional hazards survival modeling to study dropout. Results: Analyses of 4,448 clinic visits by 723 pain patients indicated that UDS exposure in the first visit is associated with increased risk of no-show in the second visit (OR = 2.73, P

AB - Background: The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in both the prescription of opioids for managing chronic pain, and an increase in opioid-related deaths in the US. Urine drug screening (UDS) is the de facto monitoring tool aimed at detecting and deterring opioid misuse. Objective: We study whether administering UDS on pain patients influences post-screening behavior of no-shows and dropouts. Study Design: Observational cohort study of electronic medical records. Setting: Single urban academic pain-clinic. Methods: A retrospective cohort comparison of patients receiving UDS versus those not receiving UDS was conducted on the entire sample as well as in the propensity score-matched samples in which matching was based on age, gender, pain-score, procedure-scheduled, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), pulse, temperature, physician ID, year of visit, psychology referral, and opioid prescription in the first visit. In addition, we conducted within-subjects logistic-regression to study no-shows and non-proportional hazards survival modeling to study dropout. Results: Analyses of 4,448 clinic visits by 723 pain patients indicated that UDS exposure in the first visit is associated with increased risk of no-show in the second visit (OR = 2.73, P

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