Implantable port devices are catheters of choice for administration of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients - A clinical experience in Pakistan

Barkat Hooda, Gulrose Lalani, Zehra Fadoo, Ghaffar Billoo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phlebitis and cellulitis are commonly encountered problems in oncology patients receiving chemotherapy through peripherally inserted intravenous catheters. Use of central venous access devices (CVAD) is desirable. We have seen a steady increase in the use of CVADs in our oncology service with frequent use of indwelling ports, particularly during the last 2 years. In this study we have attempted to elucidate advantages of CVAD and compared them to peripheral catheters. This is a retrospective study with chart review of all oncology patients admitted in our oncology service at the Aga Khan University Hospital from March 2003 to March 2005. A survey was also conducted from a randomly selected sample of parents of children with cancer to elicit parental views regarding their choice of a particular catheter. Catheter-related infections were quite common (over 50%) in patients with peripheral lines, resulting in increased costs and prolonged hospitalization. Externalized CVADs were found difficult to care for, carried a risk of being accidentally pulled out or punctured, and were deemed undesirable for older female patients for cosmetic reasons. We found that the internalized CVADs (portacath) were superior to the externalized or peripheral lines and resulted in better patient and family satisfaction. Use of peripheral lines must be gradually phased out of pediatric oncology practice in Pakistan. Indwelling CVADs have become the standard of care internationally and should be considered for most patients in developing countries whenever resources are available.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Pages43-46
Number of pages4
Volume1138
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1138
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

Fingerprint

Vascular Access Devices
Pediatrics
Indwelling Catheters
Oncology
Chemotherapy
Catheters
Pakistan
Drug Therapy
Equipment and Supplies
Phlebitis
Catheter-Related Infections
Cellulitis
Standard of Care
Patient Satisfaction
Developing countries
Cosmetics
Developing Countries
Hospitalization
Retrospective Studies
Parents

Keywords

  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia
  • Pediatric oncology
  • Portacath
  • Vascular access

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Hooda, B., Lalani, G., Fadoo, Z., & Billoo, G. (2008). Implantable port devices are catheters of choice for administration of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients - A clinical experience in Pakistan. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 1138, pp. 43-46). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1138). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1414.007

Implantable port devices are catheters of choice for administration of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients - A clinical experience in Pakistan. / Hooda, Barkat; Lalani, Gulrose; Fadoo, Zehra; Billoo, Ghaffar.

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1138 2008. p. 43-46 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1138).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hooda, B, Lalani, G, Fadoo, Z & Billoo, G 2008, Implantable port devices are catheters of choice for administration of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients - A clinical experience in Pakistan. in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. vol. 1138, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1138, pp. 43-46. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1414.007
Hooda B, Lalani G, Fadoo Z, Billoo G. Implantable port devices are catheters of choice for administration of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients - A clinical experience in Pakistan. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1138. 2008. p. 43-46. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1414.007
Hooda, Barkat ; Lalani, Gulrose ; Fadoo, Zehra ; Billoo, Ghaffar. / Implantable port devices are catheters of choice for administration of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients - A clinical experience in Pakistan. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1138 2008. pp. 43-46 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
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