Implications of Maple Syrup Urine Disease in Newborns

Pamela Harris-Haman, Lenora Brown, Susan Massey, Sivaranjani Ramamoorthy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited metabolic disorder that affects the body's ability to metabolize amino acids. If left untreated, it places newborns at risk for life-threatening health problems, including episodes of illness called metabolic crisis. Newborn screening for MSUD should ideally be done within the first 24 to 48 hours after birth. With proper screening, along with genetic counseling, nutritional counseling, primary care follow-up, and ongoing monitoring, newborns with MSUD can typically go on to live healthful lives. Nurses play a key role in supporting families with a diagnosis of MSUD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-206
Number of pages11
JournalNursing for Women's Health
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Maple Syrup Urine Disease
Newborn Infant
Aptitude
Genetic Counseling
Counseling
Primary Health Care
Nurses
Parturition
Amino Acids
Health

Keywords

  • genetic testing
  • maple syrup urine disease
  • metabolic disorders
  • newborn screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Implications of Maple Syrup Urine Disease in Newborns. / Harris-Haman, Pamela; Brown, Lenora; Massey, Susan; Ramamoorthy, Sivaranjani.

In: Nursing for Women's Health, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.06.2017, p. 196-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris-Haman, Pamela ; Brown, Lenora ; Massey, Susan ; Ramamoorthy, Sivaranjani. / Implications of Maple Syrup Urine Disease in Newborns. In: Nursing for Women's Health. 2017 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 196-206.
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