Improved recovery from skeletal muscle damage is largely unexplained by myofibrillar protein synthesis or inflammatory and regenerative gene expression pathways

George F. Pavis, Tom S.O. Jameson, Marlou L. Dirks, Benjamin P. Lee, Doaa R. Abdelrahman, Andrew J. Murton, Craig Porter, Nima Alamdari, Catherine R. Mikus, Benjamin T. Wall, Francis B. Stephens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The contribution of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MyoPS) to recovery from skeletal muscle damage in humans is unknown. Recreationally active men and women consumed a daily protein-polyphenol beverage targeted at increasing amino acid availability and reducing inflammation (PPB; n = 9), both known to affect MyoPS, or an isocaloric placebo (PLA; n = 9) during 168 h of recovery from 300 maximal unilateral eccentric contractions (EE). Muscle function was assessed daily. Muscle biopsies were collected for 24, 27, 36, 72, and 168 h for MyoPS measurements using 2H2O and expression of 224 genes using RT-qPCR and pathway analysis. PPB improved recovery of muscle function, which was impaired for 5 days after EE in PLA (interaction P < 0.05). Acute postprandial MyoPS rates were unaffected by nutritional intervention (24-27 h). EE increased overnight (27-36 h) MyoPS versus the control leg (PLA: 33 ± 19%; PPB: 79 ± 25%; leg P < 0.01), and PPB tended to increase this further (interaction P = 0.06). Daily MyoPS rates were greater with PPB between 72 and 168 h after EE, albeit after function had recovered. Inflammatory and regenerative signaling pathways were dramatically upregulated and clustered after EE but were unaffected by nutritional intervention. These results suggest that accelerated recovery from EE is not explained by elevated MyoPS or suppression of inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E291-E305
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume320
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Deuterated water
  • Gene expression
  • Muscle damage
  • Protein-polyphenol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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