In-human subject-specific evaluation of a control-theoretic plasma volume regulation model

Ramin Bighamian, Michael Kinsky, George Kramer, Jin Oh Hahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of this study was to conduct a subject-specific evaluation of a control-theoretic plasma volume regulation model in humans. We employed a set of clinical data collected from nine human subjects receiving fluid bolus with and without co-administration of an inotrope agent, including fluid infusion rate, plasma volume, and urine output. Once fitted to the data associated with each subject, the model accurately reproduced the fractional plasma volume change responses in all subjects: the error between actual versus model-reproduced fractional plasma volume change responses was only 1.4 ± 1.6% and 1.2 ± 0.3% of the average fractional plasma volume change responses in the absence and presence of inotrope co-administration. In addition, the model parameters determined by the subject-specific fitting assumed physiologically plausible values: (i) initial plasma volume was estimated to be 36 ± 11 mL/kg and 37 ± 10 mL/kg in the absence and presence of inotrope infusion, respectively, which was comparable to its actual counterpart of 37 ± 4 mL/kg and 43 ± 6 mL/kg; (ii) volume distribution ratio, specifying the ratio with which the inputted fluid is distributed in the intra- and extra-vascular spaces, was estimated to be 3.5 ± 2.4 and 1.9 ± 0.5 in the absence and presence of inotrope infusion, respectively, which accorded with the experimental observation that inotrope could enhance plasma volume expansion in response to fluid infusion. We concluded that the model was equipped with the ability to reproduce plasma volume response to fluid infusion in humans with physiologically plausible model parameters, and its validity may persist even under co-administration of inotropic agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-102
Number of pages7
JournalComputers in Biology and Medicine
Volume91
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Plasma Volume
Plasmas
Fluids
Blood Vessels
Urine

Keywords

  • Blood volume
  • Circulatory resuscitation
  • Control-theoretic model
  • In-silico evaluation
  • Mathematical model
  • Physiological closed-loop control
  • Physiological model
  • Plasma volume
  • Pre-clinical evaluation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

In-human subject-specific evaluation of a control-theoretic plasma volume regulation model. / Bighamian, Ramin; Kinsky, Michael; Kramer, George; Hahn, Jin Oh.

In: Computers in Biology and Medicine, Vol. 91, 01.12.2017, p. 96-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5ca8822ef7344cec9fc1734431fd9d73,
title = "In-human subject-specific evaluation of a control-theoretic plasma volume regulation model",
abstract = "The goal of this study was to conduct a subject-specific evaluation of a control-theoretic plasma volume regulation model in humans. We employed a set of clinical data collected from nine human subjects receiving fluid bolus with and without co-administration of an inotrope agent, including fluid infusion rate, plasma volume, and urine output. Once fitted to the data associated with each subject, the model accurately reproduced the fractional plasma volume change responses in all subjects: the error between actual versus model-reproduced fractional plasma volume change responses was only 1.4 ± 1.6{\%} and 1.2 ± 0.3{\%} of the average fractional plasma volume change responses in the absence and presence of inotrope co-administration. In addition, the model parameters determined by the subject-specific fitting assumed physiologically plausible values: (i) initial plasma volume was estimated to be 36 ± 11 mL/kg and 37 ± 10 mL/kg in the absence and presence of inotrope infusion, respectively, which was comparable to its actual counterpart of 37 ± 4 mL/kg and 43 ± 6 mL/kg; (ii) volume distribution ratio, specifying the ratio with which the inputted fluid is distributed in the intra- and extra-vascular spaces, was estimated to be 3.5 ± 2.4 and 1.9 ± 0.5 in the absence and presence of inotrope infusion, respectively, which accorded with the experimental observation that inotrope could enhance plasma volume expansion in response to fluid infusion. We concluded that the model was equipped with the ability to reproduce plasma volume response to fluid infusion in humans with physiologically plausible model parameters, and its validity may persist even under co-administration of inotropic agents.",
keywords = "Blood volume, Circulatory resuscitation, Control-theoretic model, In-silico evaluation, Mathematical model, Physiological closed-loop control, Physiological model, Plasma volume, Pre-clinical evaluation",
author = "Ramin Bighamian and Michael Kinsky and George Kramer and Hahn, {Jin Oh}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.compbiomed.2017.10.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "91",
pages = "96--102",
journal = "Computers in Biology and Medicine",
issn = "0010-4825",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In-human subject-specific evaluation of a control-theoretic plasma volume regulation model

AU - Bighamian, Ramin

AU - Kinsky, Michael

AU - Kramer, George

AU - Hahn, Jin Oh

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - The goal of this study was to conduct a subject-specific evaluation of a control-theoretic plasma volume regulation model in humans. We employed a set of clinical data collected from nine human subjects receiving fluid bolus with and without co-administration of an inotrope agent, including fluid infusion rate, plasma volume, and urine output. Once fitted to the data associated with each subject, the model accurately reproduced the fractional plasma volume change responses in all subjects: the error between actual versus model-reproduced fractional plasma volume change responses was only 1.4 ± 1.6% and 1.2 ± 0.3% of the average fractional plasma volume change responses in the absence and presence of inotrope co-administration. In addition, the model parameters determined by the subject-specific fitting assumed physiologically plausible values: (i) initial plasma volume was estimated to be 36 ± 11 mL/kg and 37 ± 10 mL/kg in the absence and presence of inotrope infusion, respectively, which was comparable to its actual counterpart of 37 ± 4 mL/kg and 43 ± 6 mL/kg; (ii) volume distribution ratio, specifying the ratio with which the inputted fluid is distributed in the intra- and extra-vascular spaces, was estimated to be 3.5 ± 2.4 and 1.9 ± 0.5 in the absence and presence of inotrope infusion, respectively, which accorded with the experimental observation that inotrope could enhance plasma volume expansion in response to fluid infusion. We concluded that the model was equipped with the ability to reproduce plasma volume response to fluid infusion in humans with physiologically plausible model parameters, and its validity may persist even under co-administration of inotropic agents.

AB - The goal of this study was to conduct a subject-specific evaluation of a control-theoretic plasma volume regulation model in humans. We employed a set of clinical data collected from nine human subjects receiving fluid bolus with and without co-administration of an inotrope agent, including fluid infusion rate, plasma volume, and urine output. Once fitted to the data associated with each subject, the model accurately reproduced the fractional plasma volume change responses in all subjects: the error between actual versus model-reproduced fractional plasma volume change responses was only 1.4 ± 1.6% and 1.2 ± 0.3% of the average fractional plasma volume change responses in the absence and presence of inotrope co-administration. In addition, the model parameters determined by the subject-specific fitting assumed physiologically plausible values: (i) initial plasma volume was estimated to be 36 ± 11 mL/kg and 37 ± 10 mL/kg in the absence and presence of inotrope infusion, respectively, which was comparable to its actual counterpart of 37 ± 4 mL/kg and 43 ± 6 mL/kg; (ii) volume distribution ratio, specifying the ratio with which the inputted fluid is distributed in the intra- and extra-vascular spaces, was estimated to be 3.5 ± 2.4 and 1.9 ± 0.5 in the absence and presence of inotrope infusion, respectively, which accorded with the experimental observation that inotrope could enhance plasma volume expansion in response to fluid infusion. We concluded that the model was equipped with the ability to reproduce plasma volume response to fluid infusion in humans with physiologically plausible model parameters, and its validity may persist even under co-administration of inotropic agents.

KW - Blood volume

KW - Circulatory resuscitation

KW - Control-theoretic model

KW - In-silico evaluation

KW - Mathematical model

KW - Physiological closed-loop control

KW - Physiological model

KW - Plasma volume

KW - Pre-clinical evaluation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85031736267&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85031736267&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.compbiomed.2017.10.006

DO - 10.1016/j.compbiomed.2017.10.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 29049911

AN - SCOPUS:85031736267

VL - 91

SP - 96

EP - 102

JO - Computers in Biology and Medicine

JF - Computers in Biology and Medicine

SN - 0010-4825

ER -