In-line miniature 3D-printed pressure-cycled ventilator maintains respiratory homeostasis in swine with induced acute pulmonary injury

William F. Pritchard, John W. Karanian, Chris Jung, Ivane Bakhutashvili, Sheridan L. Reed, Matthew F. Starost, Brian R. Froelke, Teresa R. Barnes, Duncan Stevenson, Artemio Mendoza, David J. Eckstein, Bradford J. Wood, Brian K. Walsh, Andrew J. Mannes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic demonstrated the need for inexpensive, easy-to-use, rapidly mass-produced resuscitation devices that could be quickly distributed in areas of critical need. In-line miniature ventilators based on principles of fluidics ventilate patients by automatically oscillating between forced inspiration and assisted expiration as airway pressure changes, requiring only a continuous supply of pressurized oxygen. Here, we designed three miniature ventilator models to operate in specific pressure ranges along a continuum of clinical lung injury (mild, moderate, and severe injury). Three-dimensional (3D)-printed prototype devices evaluated in a lung simulator generated airway pressures, tidal volumes, and minute ventilation within the targeted range for the state of lung disease each was designed to support. In testing in domestic swine before and after induction of pulmonary injury, the ventilators for mild and moderate injury met the design criteria when matched with the appropriate degree of lung injury. Although the ventilator for severe injury provided the specified design pressures, respiratory rate was elevated with reduced minute ventilation, a result of lung compliance below design parameters. Respiratory rate reflected how well each ventilator matched the injury state of the lungs and could guide selection of ventilator models in clinical use. This simple device could help mitigate shortages of conventional ventilators during pandemics and other disasters requiring rapid access to advanced airway management, or in transport applications for hands-free ventilation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbereabm8351
JournalScience Translational Medicine
Volume14
Issue number666
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 12 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'In-line miniature 3D-printed pressure-cycled ventilator maintains respiratory homeostasis in swine with induced acute pulmonary injury'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this