In the best interests of.

Howard Brody, William G. Bartholome

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two commentaries examine the validity of the concept of "best interests of the infant" as the moral criterion upon which to base an ethically sound decision concerning medical care. Four opposing lines of argument, that infants have no interests in continued life, that infants' interests are unknowable, that an interests appeal can yield counterintuitive results, and that others' interests also deserve consideration are presented by Brody to show the complexity and ambiguity of treatment decisions. Bartholome argues that, while the concept of best interests does not function well as an objective criterion for analysis of medical ethical problems, it has value as a device that locates what is at stake in a problem and focuses the decision making process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-40
Number of pages4
JournalThe Hastings Center report
Volume18
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Ethical Analysis
infant
Decision Making
Equipment and Supplies
decision making process
medical care
appeal
Therapeutics
Values
Medical Care
Decision-making Process

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nursing(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Brody, H., & Bartholome, W. G. (1988). In the best interests of. The Hastings Center report, 18(6), 37-40.

In the best interests of. / Brody, Howard; Bartholome, William G.

In: The Hastings Center report, Vol. 18, No. 6, 12.1988, p. 37-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brody, H & Bartholome, WG 1988, 'In the best interests of.', The Hastings Center report, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 37-40.
Brody H, Bartholome WG. In the best interests of. The Hastings Center report. 1988 Dec;18(6):37-40.
Brody, Howard ; Bartholome, William G. / In the best interests of. In: The Hastings Center report. 1988 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 37-40.
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