Incidence of human papillomavirus-related cancers among males and females aged 15-34 years in the United States

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Postmarket surveillance of the incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers is essential to monitor the effectiveness of HPV vaccines. We directly compared HPV-related cancer incidences during the pre- and postvaccine era to assess the effects of HPV vaccination among vaccine-eligible age groups in the United States using data from the US Cancer Statistics database. The 5-year average annual incidence rates for HPV-related cancers decreased in 2015-2019 compared with 2002-2006 among females aged 15-24 years and 25-34 years. Overall, a decrease in young males was not observed, whereas males aged 25-34 years experienced a slight decline in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma between 2005-2009 and 2015-2019. Incidence rates for HPV-related cancers statistically significantly decreased in the vaccine era compared with the prevaccine era among females aged 15-34 years, suggesting the potential early effects of the introduction of HPV vaccination in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberpkad016
JournalJNCI Cancer Spectrum
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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