Including students who are visually impaired in the classroom: Attitudes of preservice teachers

Paul M. Ajuwon, Huda Sarraj, Nora Griffin-Shirley, De Ann Lechtenberger, Li Zhou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study examines the perceptions of preservice teachers concerning the inclusion of students with blindness or low vision (visual impairments) in their classrooms. Methods: Using a modified version of the Preservice Inclusion Scale (PSIS), data were collected from participants in three universities in the United States before and after the completion of an introductory special education course. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) test was conducted to investigate the change in participants’ attitudes toward inclusion. Results: The anxiety measure revealed an increase in the calmness level of preservice teachers, and the receptivity measure revealed a nonsignificant change in their receptivity level toward inclusion. Discussion: There were three main study outcomes: A between-subject effect of the universities was not evident, no significant changes in hostility or receptivity were found, and the confidence of preservice teachers in teaching students with visual impairments was not a predictor of changes in attitudes toward inclusion. Suggestions for future research: Future research should determine the nature and scope of strategies included in coursework, and whether these strategies relate more to improvements in attitudes than to coursework that does not include them

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-140
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Visual Impairment and Blindness
Volume109
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vision Disorders
Students
Low Vision
Special Education
Hostility
Blindness
Analysis of Variance
Teaching
Multivariate Analysis
Anxiety
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Ajuwon, P. M., Sarraj, H., Griffin-Shirley, N., Lechtenberger, D. A., & Zhou, L. (2015). Including students who are visually impaired in the classroom: Attitudes of preservice teachers. Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 109(2), 131-140.

Including students who are visually impaired in the classroom : Attitudes of preservice teachers. / Ajuwon, Paul M.; Sarraj, Huda; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Lechtenberger, De Ann; Zhou, Li.

In: Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, Vol. 109, No. 2, 2015, p. 131-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ajuwon, PM, Sarraj, H, Griffin-Shirley, N, Lechtenberger, DA & Zhou, L 2015, 'Including students who are visually impaired in the classroom: Attitudes of preservice teachers', Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, vol. 109, no. 2, pp. 131-140.
Ajuwon, Paul M. ; Sarraj, Huda ; Griffin-Shirley, Nora ; Lechtenberger, De Ann ; Zhou, Li. / Including students who are visually impaired in the classroom : Attitudes of preservice teachers. In: Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness. 2015 ; Vol. 109, No. 2. pp. 131-140.
@article{4a9c9d387d0143e0afcee8b50f9daa26,
title = "Including students who are visually impaired in the classroom: Attitudes of preservice teachers",
abstract = "Introduction: This study examines the perceptions of preservice teachers concerning the inclusion of students with blindness or low vision (visual impairments) in their classrooms. Methods: Using a modified version of the Preservice Inclusion Scale (PSIS), data were collected from participants in three universities in the United States before and after the completion of an introductory special education course. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) test was conducted to investigate the change in participants’ attitudes toward inclusion. Results: The anxiety measure revealed an increase in the calmness level of preservice teachers, and the receptivity measure revealed a nonsignificant change in their receptivity level toward inclusion. Discussion: There were three main study outcomes: A between-subject effect of the universities was not evident, no significant changes in hostility or receptivity were found, and the confidence of preservice teachers in teaching students with visual impairments was not a predictor of changes in attitudes toward inclusion. Suggestions for future research: Future research should determine the nature and scope of strategies included in coursework, and whether these strategies relate more to improvements in attitudes than to coursework that does not include them",
author = "Ajuwon, {Paul M.} and Huda Sarraj and Nora Griffin-Shirley and Lechtenberger, {De Ann} and Li Zhou",
year = "2015",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "109",
pages = "131--140",
journal = "Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness",
issn = "0145-482X",
publisher = "AFB Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Including students who are visually impaired in the classroom

T2 - Attitudes of preservice teachers

AU - Ajuwon, Paul M.

AU - Sarraj, Huda

AU - Griffin-Shirley, Nora

AU - Lechtenberger, De Ann

AU - Zhou, Li

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Introduction: This study examines the perceptions of preservice teachers concerning the inclusion of students with blindness or low vision (visual impairments) in their classrooms. Methods: Using a modified version of the Preservice Inclusion Scale (PSIS), data were collected from participants in three universities in the United States before and after the completion of an introductory special education course. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) test was conducted to investigate the change in participants’ attitudes toward inclusion. Results: The anxiety measure revealed an increase in the calmness level of preservice teachers, and the receptivity measure revealed a nonsignificant change in their receptivity level toward inclusion. Discussion: There were three main study outcomes: A between-subject effect of the universities was not evident, no significant changes in hostility or receptivity were found, and the confidence of preservice teachers in teaching students with visual impairments was not a predictor of changes in attitudes toward inclusion. Suggestions for future research: Future research should determine the nature and scope of strategies included in coursework, and whether these strategies relate more to improvements in attitudes than to coursework that does not include them

AB - Introduction: This study examines the perceptions of preservice teachers concerning the inclusion of students with blindness or low vision (visual impairments) in their classrooms. Methods: Using a modified version of the Preservice Inclusion Scale (PSIS), data were collected from participants in three universities in the United States before and after the completion of an introductory special education course. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) test was conducted to investigate the change in participants’ attitudes toward inclusion. Results: The anxiety measure revealed an increase in the calmness level of preservice teachers, and the receptivity measure revealed a nonsignificant change in their receptivity level toward inclusion. Discussion: There were three main study outcomes: A between-subject effect of the universities was not evident, no significant changes in hostility or receptivity were found, and the confidence of preservice teachers in teaching students with visual impairments was not a predictor of changes in attitudes toward inclusion. Suggestions for future research: Future research should determine the nature and scope of strategies included in coursework, and whether these strategies relate more to improvements in attitudes than to coursework that does not include them

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84929404865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84929404865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84929404865

VL - 109

SP - 131

EP - 140

JO - Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness

JF - Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness

SN - 0145-482X

IS - 2

ER -