Increasing BMI is associated with both endometrioid and serous histotypes among endometrial rather than ovarian cancers: a case-to-case study

Giovanni Grandi, Anna Myriam Perrone, Giuseppe Chiossi, Stefano Friso, Angela Toss, Margaret Sammarini, Fabio Facchinetti, Laura Botticelli, Federica Palma, Pierandrea De Iaco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Although obesity has been associated with endometrioid (type I) and, to a lesser extent, with serous (type II) endometrial cancer (EC), the association with the same histotypes of ovarian cancer (OC) remains unclear. Therefore, we intended to compare the role of BMI in carcinogenesis of endometrioid and the serous malignancies, at both ovarian and endometrial level. Methods: A retrospective case-to-case study was performed in the University Hospital of Bologna (Italy), through the review of primary EC matched with the corresponding OC cases in the same period (1988–2017). Results: We included 1052 women diagnosed with EC (n = 897 endometrioid, n = 52 serous) and 955 women affected by OC (n = 132 endometrioid, n = 627 serous). EC patients had higher median BMI than women diagnosed with OC (27.3 [23.4–31.9] vs 24.9 [21.7–27.5], p < 0.01). After controlling for confounding, 1 unit increase in BMI was associated with a 5% higher odds of endometrial as opposed to ovarian cancer (OR for ovarian as opposed to endometrial cancer 0.95; 95% CI 0.91–0.98, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Increasing BMI is associated with endometrial rather than ovarian cancer, among both serous and endometrioid histotypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGynecologic Oncology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ovarian Neoplasms
Endometrial Neoplasms
Italy
Carcinogenesis
Obesity
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Endometrioid
  • Obesity
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Serous

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Increasing BMI is associated with both endometrioid and serous histotypes among endometrial rather than ovarian cancers : a case-to-case study. / Grandi, Giovanni; Perrone, Anna Myriam; Chiossi, Giuseppe; Friso, Stefano; Toss, Angela; Sammarini, Margaret; Facchinetti, Fabio; Botticelli, Laura; Palma, Federica; De Iaco, Pierandrea.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grandi, Giovanni ; Perrone, Anna Myriam ; Chiossi, Giuseppe ; Friso, Stefano ; Toss, Angela ; Sammarini, Margaret ; Facchinetti, Fabio ; Botticelli, Laura ; Palma, Federica ; De Iaco, Pierandrea. / Increasing BMI is associated with both endometrioid and serous histotypes among endometrial rather than ovarian cancers : a case-to-case study. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 2019.
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abstract = "Aim: Although obesity has been associated with endometrioid (type I) and, to a lesser extent, with serous (type II) endometrial cancer (EC), the association with the same histotypes of ovarian cancer (OC) remains unclear. Therefore, we intended to compare the role of BMI in carcinogenesis of endometrioid and the serous malignancies, at both ovarian and endometrial level. Methods: A retrospective case-to-case study was performed in the University Hospital of Bologna (Italy), through the review of primary EC matched with the corresponding OC cases in the same period (1988–2017). Results: We included 1052 women diagnosed with EC (n = 897 endometrioid, n = 52 serous) and 955 women affected by OC (n = 132 endometrioid, n = 627 serous). EC patients had higher median BMI than women diagnosed with OC (27.3 [23.4–31.9] vs 24.9 [21.7–27.5], p < 0.01). After controlling for confounding, 1 unit increase in BMI was associated with a 5{\%} higher odds of endometrial as opposed to ovarian cancer (OR for ovarian as opposed to endometrial cancer 0.95; 95{\%} CI 0.91–0.98, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Increasing BMI is associated with endometrial rather than ovarian cancer, among both serous and endometrioid histotypes.",
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author = "Giovanni Grandi and Perrone, {Anna Myriam} and Giuseppe Chiossi and Stefano Friso and Angela Toss and Margaret Sammarini and Fabio Facchinetti and Laura Botticelli and Federica Palma and {De Iaco}, Pierandrea",
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T2 - a case-to-case study

AU - Grandi, Giovanni

AU - Perrone, Anna Myriam

AU - Chiossi, Giuseppe

AU - Friso, Stefano

AU - Toss, Angela

AU - Sammarini, Margaret

AU - Facchinetti, Fabio

AU - Botticelli, Laura

AU - Palma, Federica

AU - De Iaco, Pierandrea

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N2 - Aim: Although obesity has been associated with endometrioid (type I) and, to a lesser extent, with serous (type II) endometrial cancer (EC), the association with the same histotypes of ovarian cancer (OC) remains unclear. Therefore, we intended to compare the role of BMI in carcinogenesis of endometrioid and the serous malignancies, at both ovarian and endometrial level. Methods: A retrospective case-to-case study was performed in the University Hospital of Bologna (Italy), through the review of primary EC matched with the corresponding OC cases in the same period (1988–2017). Results: We included 1052 women diagnosed with EC (n = 897 endometrioid, n = 52 serous) and 955 women affected by OC (n = 132 endometrioid, n = 627 serous). EC patients had higher median BMI than women diagnosed with OC (27.3 [23.4–31.9] vs 24.9 [21.7–27.5], p < 0.01). After controlling for confounding, 1 unit increase in BMI was associated with a 5% higher odds of endometrial as opposed to ovarian cancer (OR for ovarian as opposed to endometrial cancer 0.95; 95% CI 0.91–0.98, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Increasing BMI is associated with endometrial rather than ovarian cancer, among both serous and endometrioid histotypes.

AB - Aim: Although obesity has been associated with endometrioid (type I) and, to a lesser extent, with serous (type II) endometrial cancer (EC), the association with the same histotypes of ovarian cancer (OC) remains unclear. Therefore, we intended to compare the role of BMI in carcinogenesis of endometrioid and the serous malignancies, at both ovarian and endometrial level. Methods: A retrospective case-to-case study was performed in the University Hospital of Bologna (Italy), through the review of primary EC matched with the corresponding OC cases in the same period (1988–2017). Results: We included 1052 women diagnosed with EC (n = 897 endometrioid, n = 52 serous) and 955 women affected by OC (n = 132 endometrioid, n = 627 serous). EC patients had higher median BMI than women diagnosed with OC (27.3 [23.4–31.9] vs 24.9 [21.7–27.5], p < 0.01). After controlling for confounding, 1 unit increase in BMI was associated with a 5% higher odds of endometrial as opposed to ovarian cancer (OR for ovarian as opposed to endometrial cancer 0.95; 95% CI 0.91–0.98, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Increasing BMI is associated with endometrial rather than ovarian cancer, among both serous and endometrioid histotypes.

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KW - Ovarian cancer

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