Increasing resident recruitment into family medicine

Effect of a unique curriculum in integrative medicine

Patricia Lebensohn, Sally Dodds, Audrey J. Brooks, Paula Cook, Mary Guerrera, Victor Sierpina, Raymond Teets, John Woytowicz, Victoria Maizes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Healthcare reform is highlighting the need for more family practice and other primary care physicians. The Integrative Medicine in Residency (IMR) curriculum project helped family medicine residencies pilot a new, online curriculum promoting prevention, patient-centered care competencies, use of complementary and alternative medicine along with conventional medicine for management of chronic illness. A major potential benefit of the IMR program is enhanced recruitment into participating residencies, which is reported here. Methods Using an online questionnaire, accepted applicants to the eight IMR pilot programs (n = 152) and four control programs (n = 50) were asked about their interests in learning integrative medicine (IM) and in the pilot sites how the presence of the IMR curriculum affected their ranking decisions. Results Of residents at the IMR sites, 46.7% reported that the presence of the IMR was very important or important in their ranking decision. The IMR also ranked fourth overall in importance of ranking after geography, quality of faculty, and academic reputation of the residency. The majority of IMR residents (87.5%) had high to moderate interest in learning IM during their residency; control residents also had a high interest in learning IM (61.2%). Conclusions The presence of the IMR curriculum was seen as a strong positive by applicants in ranking residencies. Increasing the adoption of innovative IM curricula, such as the IMR, by residency programs may be helpful in increasing applications of competitive medical students into primary care residencies as well as in responding to the expressed interest in learning the IM approach to patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-192
Number of pages6
JournalExplore: The Journal of Science and Healing
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Integrative Medicine
Internship and Residency
Curriculum
Medicine
Ranking
Learning
Primary Care
Family
Complementary Therapies

Keywords

  • family medicine
  • family medicine residency
  • graduate medical education
  • Integrative medicine
  • medical education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Chiropractics
  • Analysis
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Increasing resident recruitment into family medicine : Effect of a unique curriculum in integrative medicine. / Lebensohn, Patricia; Dodds, Sally; Brooks, Audrey J.; Cook, Paula; Guerrera, Mary; Sierpina, Victor; Teets, Raymond; Woytowicz, John; Maizes, Victoria.

In: Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, Vol. 10, No. 3, 2014, p. 187-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lebensohn, Patricia ; Dodds, Sally ; Brooks, Audrey J. ; Cook, Paula ; Guerrera, Mary ; Sierpina, Victor ; Teets, Raymond ; Woytowicz, John ; Maizes, Victoria. / Increasing resident recruitment into family medicine : Effect of a unique curriculum in integrative medicine. In: Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing. 2014 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 187-192.
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abstract = "Introduction Healthcare reform is highlighting the need for more family practice and other primary care physicians. The Integrative Medicine in Residency (IMR) curriculum project helped family medicine residencies pilot a new, online curriculum promoting prevention, patient-centered care competencies, use of complementary and alternative medicine along with conventional medicine for management of chronic illness. A major potential benefit of the IMR program is enhanced recruitment into participating residencies, which is reported here. Methods Using an online questionnaire, accepted applicants to the eight IMR pilot programs (n = 152) and four control programs (n = 50) were asked about their interests in learning integrative medicine (IM) and in the pilot sites how the presence of the IMR curriculum affected their ranking decisions. Results Of residents at the IMR sites, 46.7{\%} reported that the presence of the IMR was very important or important in their ranking decision. The IMR also ranked fourth overall in importance of ranking after geography, quality of faculty, and academic reputation of the residency. The majority of IMR residents (87.5{\%}) had high to moderate interest in learning IM during their residency; control residents also had a high interest in learning IM (61.2{\%}). Conclusions The presence of the IMR curriculum was seen as a strong positive by applicants in ranking residencies. Increasing the adoption of innovative IM curricula, such as the IMR, by residency programs may be helpful in increasing applications of competitive medical students into primary care residencies as well as in responding to the expressed interest in learning the IM approach to patient care.",
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