Industry payments to authors of Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery shoulder arthroplasty manuscripts are accurately disclosed by most authors and are not significantly associated with better reported treatment outcomes

Jeremy S. Somerson, Matthew C. Comley, Ahmed Mansi, Moni B. Neradilek, Frederick A. Matsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Author transparency in disclosing potential conflicts of interest when reporting outcomes for shoulder arthroplasty implants is important. Using the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Open Payments Program (OPP) database, we analyzed articles in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery to evaluate (1) discrepancies between the stated conflicts of interest and associated payments recorded in the database, (2) the magnitude and types of payments received, and (3) possible relationships between industry financial support and positive study outcomes. Methods: Articles reporting clinical outcomes of shoulder arthroplasty from 2016 and 2017 were reviewed. Articles identifying a specific shoulder arthroplasty implant and having at least 1 author based in the United States were included. Payment types, amounts, and sources were extracted from disclosure statements in the manuscript and considered relevant if they were received from the implant manufacturer. Published disclosure statements were compared against the OPP database. Study outcomes demonstrating a clinical benefit were considered “positive.” Payments to authors reporting positive outcomes were compared with those reporting nonpositive outcomes. Results: Implant manufacturers provided $16,051,261 to authors of shoulder arthroplasty publications over a 2-year period. Approximately half of senior authors (46%) received royalty payments, more than 90% of which ($14,910,873; 93%) were reported in disclosure statements. Although authors of articles with positive outcomes received greater payments than those reporting nonpositive outcomes, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The majority of author disclosure statements accurately reflected the OPP data. Payments were not significantly associated with positive outcomes reported for the specific implant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-673
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Conflict of interest
  • disclosure
  • industry
  • Level IV Systematic Review
  • Literature Review
  • open payments
  • shoulder arthroplasty
  • Sunshine Act
  • Survey Study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Industry payments to authors of Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery shoulder arthroplasty manuscripts are accurately disclosed by most authors and are not significantly associated with better reported treatment outcomes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this