Inflammatory risk factors and pathologies promoting Alzheimer’s disease progression: Is RAGE the key?

Carmela Matrone, Mehdi Djelloul, Giulio Taglialatela, Lorena Perrone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epidemiological studies reveal growing evidence that most cases of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) likely involve a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Identifying and validating these risk factors remains one of the most critical scientific challenges. Several diseases appear to have strong implications for neurodegeneration leading to dementia. This risk encompasses different forms of cardiovascular disease, carotid atherosclerosis, history of hypertension or high cholesterol, Type II diabetes, stroke or transient ischemic attack and brain trauma. However, the molecular pathways that are common and central in the progression of these diseases and AD are not yet elucidated. Unveiling these critical mechanisms at the molecular level is necessary for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing AD progression. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) plays a key role in all the diseases that represent a risk for AD. RAGE-mediated signaling also contributes to neurodegeneration in AD, suggesting that it may mediate the effect of risk factors in promoting AD. We will summarize the current knowledge on the role of RAGE in pathologies promoting AD and in AD progression. We will also provide evidence showing the relevance of RAGEinduced inflammation as a risk pathway that is implicated in AD pathophysiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-139
Number of pages15
JournalHistology and Histopathology
Volume30
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Disease Progression
Alzheimer Disease
Pathology
Advanced Glycosylation End Product-Specific Receptor
Carotid Artery Diseases
Transient Ischemic Attack
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Dementia
Epidemiologic Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Stroke
Cholesterol
Hypertension
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Alzheimer Disease
  • Inflammation
  • RAGE
  • Risk factors
  • TXNIP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Histology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Inflammatory risk factors and pathologies promoting Alzheimer’s disease progression : Is RAGE the key? / Matrone, Carmela; Djelloul, Mehdi; Taglialatela, Giulio; Perrone, Lorena.

In: Histology and Histopathology, Vol. 30, No. 2, 2015, p. 125-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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