Influence of inhalation injury on energy expenditure in severely burned children

Rene Przkora, Ricki Y. Fram, David Herndon, Oscar Suman, Ronald P. Mlcak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Determine the effect of inhalation injury on burn-induced hypermetabolism in children. Design: Prospective study comparing hypermetabolism (i.e., resting energy expenditure and oxygen consumption) in burned children with and without inhalation injury during acute hospitalization. Setting: Single pediatric burn center. Patients: Eighty-six children (1-18 years) with ≥40% total body surface area burns were stratified to two groups: no inhalation injury and inhalation injury. Interventions: None. Main measurements and results: Inhalation injury was diagnosed based on bronchoscopic evaluation. At admission, PaO2:FiO2 ratios (an index of respiratory distress) were significantly higher in patients with no inhalation injury than in patient with inhalation injury. No differences were detected in resting energy expenditure or percent of the predicted basal metabolic rate between groups. Additionally, oxygen consumption did not significantly differ between groups. Conclusions: Inhalation injury does not augment the burn-induced hypermetabolic stress response in children, as reflected by resting energy expenditure and oxygen consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1487-1491
Number of pages5
JournalBurns
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Inhalation
Energy Metabolism
Wounds and Injuries
Burns
Oxygen Consumption
Burn Units
Basal Metabolism
Body Surface Area
Hospitalization
Prospective Studies
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Burns
  • Hypermetabolism
  • Indirect calorimetry
  • Inhalation injury
  • Oxygen consumption
  • Resting energy expenditure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Influence of inhalation injury on energy expenditure in severely burned children. / Przkora, Rene; Fram, Ricki Y.; Herndon, David; Suman, Oscar; Mlcak, Ronald P.

In: Burns, Vol. 40, No. 8, 01.12.2014, p. 1487-1491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Przkora, Rene ; Fram, Ricki Y. ; Herndon, David ; Suman, Oscar ; Mlcak, Ronald P. / Influence of inhalation injury on energy expenditure in severely burned children. In: Burns. 2014 ; Vol. 40, No. 8. pp. 1487-1491.
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