Influence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Exposure on Cardiovascular and Salivary Biosensors: Is There a Relationship?

Leslie R. Halpern, Malcolm L. Shealer, Rian Cho, Elizabeth B. McMichael, Joseph Rogers, Daphne Ferguson-Young, Charles Mouton, Mohammad Tabatabai, Janet Southerland, Pandu Gangula

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/purpose: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health epidemic that initiates/exacerbates health consequences affecting a victim's lifespan. IPV can significantly predispose women to a lifetime risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) due to the effects of stress and inflammation. This study investigates the correlation among IPV exposure, in-vivo CVD events, and inflammatory biomarkers as predictor indices(s) for CVD in female dental patients. Methods: Of 37 women enrolled in this study, 19 were African-American (AA) and 18 non-African-American (non-AA) and their ages ranged from 19 to 63 years. IPV-exposure and stress-induced in-vivo CVD events such as Chest Pain (CP) and Heart palpitations were recorded from all enrolled subjects. Cardiovascular events were obtained through surveys by patient self-report. Saliva specimens were obtained from all women and were analyzed for CVD biomarkers using multiplex-ELISA. Results: The prevalence of IPV was 51% (19/37) and statistically equivalent for AA and non-AA. The results show differences in experience of 1) CP (p < 0.01) and 2) heart palpitations (p < 0.02) when IPV + participants are compared with IPV- AA and non-AA cohorts. Of 10 CVD biomarkers analyzed, significant correlations between IPV+ and IPV- subjects were observed for biomarkers that include Interleukin-1β/sCD40L; TNFα/sCD40L; Myoglobin/IL-1β; CRP/sCD40L; CRP/IL-6; CRP/TNFα; TNFα/siCAM; CRP/MMP9; TNF-α/Adiponectin (p < 0.01). Discussion/Implications: Analysis of in vivo CVD status showed that significant race/health disparities exist in IPV + cohorts, as well as increased expression of inflammatory mediators, specifically CRP, IL-1β, IL-6, MMP9. Women who have experienced IPV may be a target cohort for primary prevention of CVD. The use of salivary biomarkers and our protocol may provide a less invasive method to help increase identification of victims at risk for IPV and CVD and potentially decrease other health injuries associated with IPV exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease (CVD)
  • Facial injuries
  • Health disparities
  • Intimate partner violence (IPV)
  • Questionnaires
  • Saliva

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Influence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Exposure on Cardiovascular and Salivary Biosensors: Is There a Relationship?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Halpern, L. R., Shealer, M. L., Cho, R., McMichael, E. B., Rogers, J., Ferguson-Young, D., Mouton, C., Tabatabai, M., Southerland, J., & Gangula, P. (Accepted/In press). Influence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Exposure on Cardiovascular and Salivary Biosensors: Is There a Relationship? Journal of the National Medical Association. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnma.2017.08.001