Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru

V. Alberto Laguna-Torres, Jorge Gómez, Victor Ocaña, Patricia Aguilar, Tatiana Saldarriaga, Edward Chavez, Juan Perez, Hernán Zamalloa, Brett Forshey, Irmia Paz, Elizabeth Gomez, Roel Ore, Gloria Chauca, Ernesto Ortiz, Manuel Villaran, Stalin Vilcarromero, Claudio Rocha, Omayra Chincha, Gerardo Jiménez, Miguel Villanueva & 3 others Edwar Pozo, Jackeline Aspajo, Tadeusz Kochel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Acute respiratory illnesses and influenza-like illnesses (ILI) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the public health importance, little is known about the etiology of these acute respiratory illnesses in many regions of South America. In 2006, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MoH) and the US Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD) initiated a collaboration to characterize the viral agents associated with ILI and to describe the clinical and epidemiological presentation of the affected population. Methodology/Principal Findings: Patients with ILI (fever ≥38°C and cough or sore throat) were evaluated in clinics and hospitals in 13 Peruvian cities representative of the four main regions of the country. Nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, as well as epidemiological and demographic data, were collected from each patient. During the two years of this study (June 2006 through May 2008), a total of 6,835 patients, with a median age of 13 years, were recruited from 31 clinics and hospitals; 6,308 were enrolled by regular passive surveillance and 527 were enrolled as part of outbreak investigations. At least one respiratory virus was isolated from the specimens of 2,688 (42.6%) patients, with etiologies varying by age and geographical region. Overall the most common viral agents isolated were influenza A virus (25.1%), influenza B virus (9.7%), parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, and 3, (HPIV-1,-2,-3; 3.2%), herpes simplex virus (HSV; 2.6%), and adenoviruses (1.8%). Genetic analyses of influenza virus isolates demonstrated that three lineages of influenza A H1N1, one lineage of influenza A H3N2, and two lineages of influenza B were circulating in Peru during the course of this study. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive study to date of the etiologic agents associated with ILI in Peru. These results demonstrate that a wide range of respiratory pathogens are circulating in Peru and this fact needs to be considered by clinicians when treating patients reporting with ILI. Furthermore, these data have implications for influenza vaccine design and implementation in South America.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere6118
JournalPLoS One
Volume4
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sentinel Surveillance
Peru
Viruses
influenza
Human Influenza
monitoring
South America
Geographical regions
Human parainfluenza virus 1
viruses
etiology
Influenza Vaccines
Public health
Pathogens
Influenza B virus
Paramyxoviridae Infections
outbreak investigation
Pharyngitis
cyhalothrin
herpes simplex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Laguna-Torres, V. A., Gómez, J., Ocaña, V., Aguilar, P., Saldarriaga, T., Chavez, E., ... Kochel, T. (2009). Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru. PLoS One, 4(7), [e6118]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006118

Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru. / Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Gómez, Jorge; Ocaña, Victor; Aguilar, Patricia; Saldarriaga, Tatiana; Chavez, Edward; Perez, Juan; Zamalloa, Hernán; Forshey, Brett; Paz, Irmia; Gomez, Elizabeth; Ore, Roel; Chauca, Gloria; Ortiz, Ernesto; Villaran, Manuel; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Rocha, Claudio; Chincha, Omayra; Jiménez, Gerardo; Villanueva, Miguel; Pozo, Edwar; Aspajo, Jackeline; Kochel, Tadeusz.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 4, No. 7, e6118, 01.07.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Laguna-Torres, VA, Gómez, J, Ocaña, V, Aguilar, P, Saldarriaga, T, Chavez, E, Perez, J, Zamalloa, H, Forshey, B, Paz, I, Gomez, E, Ore, R, Chauca, G, Ortiz, E, Villaran, M, Vilcarromero, S, Rocha, C, Chincha, O, Jiménez, G, Villanueva, M, Pozo, E, Aspajo, J & Kochel, T 2009, 'Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru', PLoS One, vol. 4, no. 7, e6118. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006118
Laguna-Torres VA, Gómez J, Ocaña V, Aguilar P, Saldarriaga T, Chavez E et al. Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru. PLoS One. 2009 Jul 1;4(7). e6118. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006118
Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto ; Gómez, Jorge ; Ocaña, Victor ; Aguilar, Patricia ; Saldarriaga, Tatiana ; Chavez, Edward ; Perez, Juan ; Zamalloa, Hernán ; Forshey, Brett ; Paz, Irmia ; Gomez, Elizabeth ; Ore, Roel ; Chauca, Gloria ; Ortiz, Ernesto ; Villaran, Manuel ; Vilcarromero, Stalin ; Rocha, Claudio ; Chincha, Omayra ; Jiménez, Gerardo ; Villanueva, Miguel ; Pozo, Edwar ; Aspajo, Jackeline ; Kochel, Tadeusz. / Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru. In: PLoS One. 2009 ; Vol. 4, No. 7.
@article{453616fd51e14656a57e471c6208b7c0,
title = "Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru",
abstract = "Background: Acute respiratory illnesses and influenza-like illnesses (ILI) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the public health importance, little is known about the etiology of these acute respiratory illnesses in many regions of South America. In 2006, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MoH) and the US Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD) initiated a collaboration to characterize the viral agents associated with ILI and to describe the clinical and epidemiological presentation of the affected population. Methodology/Principal Findings: Patients with ILI (fever ≥38°C and cough or sore throat) were evaluated in clinics and hospitals in 13 Peruvian cities representative of the four main regions of the country. Nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, as well as epidemiological and demographic data, were collected from each patient. During the two years of this study (June 2006 through May 2008), a total of 6,835 patients, with a median age of 13 years, were recruited from 31 clinics and hospitals; 6,308 were enrolled by regular passive surveillance and 527 were enrolled as part of outbreak investigations. At least one respiratory virus was isolated from the specimens of 2,688 (42.6{\%}) patients, with etiologies varying by age and geographical region. Overall the most common viral agents isolated were influenza A virus (25.1{\%}), influenza B virus (9.7{\%}), parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, and 3, (HPIV-1,-2,-3; 3.2{\%}), herpes simplex virus (HSV; 2.6{\%}), and adenoviruses (1.8{\%}). Genetic analyses of influenza virus isolates demonstrated that three lineages of influenza A H1N1, one lineage of influenza A H3N2, and two lineages of influenza B were circulating in Peru during the course of this study. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive study to date of the etiologic agents associated with ILI in Peru. These results demonstrate that a wide range of respiratory pathogens are circulating in Peru and this fact needs to be considered by clinicians when treating patients reporting with ILI. Furthermore, these data have implications for influenza vaccine design and implementation in South America.",
author = "Laguna-Torres, {V. Alberto} and Jorge G{\'o}mez and Victor Oca{\~n}a and Patricia Aguilar and Tatiana Saldarriaga and Edward Chavez and Juan Perez and Hern{\'a}n Zamalloa and Brett Forshey and Irmia Paz and Elizabeth Gomez and Roel Ore and Gloria Chauca and Ernesto Ortiz and Manuel Villaran and Stalin Vilcarromero and Claudio Rocha and Omayra Chincha and Gerardo Jim{\'e}nez and Miguel Villanueva and Edwar Pozo and Jackeline Aspajo and Tadeusz Kochel",
year = "2009",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0006118",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru

AU - Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

AU - Gómez, Jorge

AU - Ocaña, Victor

AU - Aguilar, Patricia

AU - Saldarriaga, Tatiana

AU - Chavez, Edward

AU - Perez, Juan

AU - Zamalloa, Hernán

AU - Forshey, Brett

AU - Paz, Irmia

AU - Gomez, Elizabeth

AU - Ore, Roel

AU - Chauca, Gloria

AU - Ortiz, Ernesto

AU - Villaran, Manuel

AU - Vilcarromero, Stalin

AU - Rocha, Claudio

AU - Chincha, Omayra

AU - Jiménez, Gerardo

AU - Villanueva, Miguel

AU - Pozo, Edwar

AU - Aspajo, Jackeline

AU - Kochel, Tadeusz

PY - 2009/7/1

Y1 - 2009/7/1

N2 - Background: Acute respiratory illnesses and influenza-like illnesses (ILI) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the public health importance, little is known about the etiology of these acute respiratory illnesses in many regions of South America. In 2006, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MoH) and the US Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD) initiated a collaboration to characterize the viral agents associated with ILI and to describe the clinical and epidemiological presentation of the affected population. Methodology/Principal Findings: Patients with ILI (fever ≥38°C and cough or sore throat) were evaluated in clinics and hospitals in 13 Peruvian cities representative of the four main regions of the country. Nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, as well as epidemiological and demographic data, were collected from each patient. During the two years of this study (June 2006 through May 2008), a total of 6,835 patients, with a median age of 13 years, were recruited from 31 clinics and hospitals; 6,308 were enrolled by regular passive surveillance and 527 were enrolled as part of outbreak investigations. At least one respiratory virus was isolated from the specimens of 2,688 (42.6%) patients, with etiologies varying by age and geographical region. Overall the most common viral agents isolated were influenza A virus (25.1%), influenza B virus (9.7%), parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, and 3, (HPIV-1,-2,-3; 3.2%), herpes simplex virus (HSV; 2.6%), and adenoviruses (1.8%). Genetic analyses of influenza virus isolates demonstrated that three lineages of influenza A H1N1, one lineage of influenza A H3N2, and two lineages of influenza B were circulating in Peru during the course of this study. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive study to date of the etiologic agents associated with ILI in Peru. These results demonstrate that a wide range of respiratory pathogens are circulating in Peru and this fact needs to be considered by clinicians when treating patients reporting with ILI. Furthermore, these data have implications for influenza vaccine design and implementation in South America.

AB - Background: Acute respiratory illnesses and influenza-like illnesses (ILI) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the public health importance, little is known about the etiology of these acute respiratory illnesses in many regions of South America. In 2006, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MoH) and the US Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD) initiated a collaboration to characterize the viral agents associated with ILI and to describe the clinical and epidemiological presentation of the affected population. Methodology/Principal Findings: Patients with ILI (fever ≥38°C and cough or sore throat) were evaluated in clinics and hospitals in 13 Peruvian cities representative of the four main regions of the country. Nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, as well as epidemiological and demographic data, were collected from each patient. During the two years of this study (June 2006 through May 2008), a total of 6,835 patients, with a median age of 13 years, were recruited from 31 clinics and hospitals; 6,308 were enrolled by regular passive surveillance and 527 were enrolled as part of outbreak investigations. At least one respiratory virus was isolated from the specimens of 2,688 (42.6%) patients, with etiologies varying by age and geographical region. Overall the most common viral agents isolated were influenza A virus (25.1%), influenza B virus (9.7%), parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, and 3, (HPIV-1,-2,-3; 3.2%), herpes simplex virus (HSV; 2.6%), and adenoviruses (1.8%). Genetic analyses of influenza virus isolates demonstrated that three lineages of influenza A H1N1, one lineage of influenza A H3N2, and two lineages of influenza B were circulating in Peru during the course of this study. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive study to date of the etiologic agents associated with ILI in Peru. These results demonstrate that a wide range of respiratory pathogens are circulating in Peru and this fact needs to be considered by clinicians when treating patients reporting with ILI. Furthermore, these data have implications for influenza vaccine design and implementation in South America.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67749110278&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67749110278&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0006118

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0006118

M3 - Article

VL - 4

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

M1 - e6118

ER -