Inhaled bronchodilator administration during mechanical ventilation.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inhaled bronchodilators are routinely administered to mechanically ventilated patients to relieve dyspnea and reverse bronchoconstriction. A lower percentage of the nominal dose reaches the lower respiratory tract in a mechanically ventilated patient than in a nonintubated subject, but attention to device selection, administration technique, dosing, and patient-ventilator interface can increase lower-respiratory-tract deposition in a mechanically ventilated patient. Assessing the airway response to bronchodilator by measuring airway resistance and intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure helps guide dosing and timing of drug delivery. Selecting the optimal aerosol-generating device for a mechanically ventilated patient requires consideration of the ease, reliability, efficacy, safety, and cost of administration. With careful attention to administration technique, bronchodilator via metered-dose inhaler or nebulizer can be safe and effective with mechanically ventilated patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-634
Number of pages12
JournalRespiratory Care
Volume49
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2004

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Bronchodilator Agents
Artificial Respiration
Respiratory System
Metered Dose Inhalers
Equipment and Supplies
Airway Resistance
Bronchoconstriction
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Mechanical Ventilators
Aerosols
Dyspnea
Safety
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Inhaled bronchodilator administration during mechanical ventilation. / Duarte, Alexander.

In: Respiratory Care, Vol. 49, No. 6, 06.2004, p. 623-634.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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