Inhibition of primate spinothalamic tract cells by TENS

K. H. Lee, Jin Chung, W. D. Willis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was applied in an experimental animal model to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this treatment. Recordings were made from identified spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons in the lumbosacral spinal cords of seven anesthetized monkeys. The STT cells were activated by stimulating the common peroneal nerve at a suprathreshold intensity for C-fibers. Evoked responses of C-fibers were compared before, during, and after application of TENS for 5 minutes from a commercially available TENS unit. The current delivered by the TENS unit was monitored. In 14 STT cells, some degree of inhibition of C-fiber evoked responses occurred only when the intensity of TENS exceeded the threshold of Aδ fibers. At a given stimulus intensity, bursts of pulses repeated at a low rate were more effective than high-rate pulses. When TENS was applied to an area of the skin within a cell's receptive field, it was more effective than when it was applied outside the receptive field. The C-fiber volley recorded from a peripheral nerve was not reduced in size, and there was no substantial changes in its latency due to TENS. The inhibition of the activity of STT cells was not altered appreciably after intravenous injection of naloxone hydrochloride. These results suggest that TENS produces central nervous system inhibition by activating Aδ afferent fibers. The inhibitory effects of TENS on STT cells appear to be due to a mechanism that does not involve release of endgenous opioid substances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-287
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume62
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1985

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Spinothalamic Tracts
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
Primates
Unmyelinated Nerve Fibers
Myelinated Nerve Fibers
Peroneal Nerve
Naloxone
Peripheral Nerves
Intravenous Injections
Opioid Analgesics
Haplorhini
Spinal Cord
Central Nervous System
Animal Models
Heart Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Inhibition of primate spinothalamic tract cells by TENS. / Lee, K. H.; Chung, Jin; Willis, W. D.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 62, No. 2, 1985, p. 276-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, KH, Chung, J & Willis, WD 1985, 'Inhibition of primate spinothalamic tract cells by TENS', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 62, no. 2, pp. 276-287.
Lee, K. H. ; Chung, Jin ; Willis, W. D. / Inhibition of primate spinothalamic tract cells by TENS. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1985 ; Vol. 62, No. 2. pp. 276-287.
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