Innovation in Conducting and Scoring a Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination

Michael Ainsworth, D. David, J. Solomon, Michael R. Callaway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Evaluation of student clinical performance is an essential task for medical educators. Standardized patients and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) can be useful tools in clinical evaluation but are often limited by artificiality, tedious scoring of open-ended responses, and limited scoring options. We describe the adaptation of an existing OSCE that decreases the need for pretest preparation, minimizes cuing effects, and increases scoring flexibility. Student response is favorable, and the use of computer-based scoring programs and optical scan technology allows faculty to spend more time on student observation, feedback, and problem development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-67
Number of pages4
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Students
innovation
examination
student
evaluation
flexibility
Observation
educator
Technology
performance
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Innovation in Conducting and Scoring a Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination. / Ainsworth, Michael; David, D.; Solomon, J.; Callaway, Michael R.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1994, p. 64-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0770cd8db91c42ceaa96781372f49bd4,
title = "Innovation in Conducting and Scoring a Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination",
abstract = "Evaluation of student clinical performance is an essential task for medical educators. Standardized patients and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) can be useful tools in clinical evaluation but are often limited by artificiality, tedious scoring of open-ended responses, and limited scoring options. We describe the adaptation of an existing OSCE that decreases the need for pretest preparation, minimizes cuing effects, and increases scoring flexibility. Student response is favorable, and the use of computer-based scoring programs and optical scan technology allows faculty to spend more time on student observation, feedback, and problem development.",
author = "Michael Ainsworth and D. David and J. Solomon and Callaway, {Michael R.}",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1080/10401339409539646",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "64--67",
journal = "Teaching and Learning in Medicine",
issn = "1040-1334",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Innovation in Conducting and Scoring a Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination

AU - Ainsworth, Michael

AU - David, D.

AU - Solomon, J.

AU - Callaway, Michael R.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Evaluation of student clinical performance is an essential task for medical educators. Standardized patients and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) can be useful tools in clinical evaluation but are often limited by artificiality, tedious scoring of open-ended responses, and limited scoring options. We describe the adaptation of an existing OSCE that decreases the need for pretest preparation, minimizes cuing effects, and increases scoring flexibility. Student response is favorable, and the use of computer-based scoring programs and optical scan technology allows faculty to spend more time on student observation, feedback, and problem development.

AB - Evaluation of student clinical performance is an essential task for medical educators. Standardized patients and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) can be useful tools in clinical evaluation but are often limited by artificiality, tedious scoring of open-ended responses, and limited scoring options. We describe the adaptation of an existing OSCE that decreases the need for pretest preparation, minimizes cuing effects, and increases scoring flexibility. Student response is favorable, and the use of computer-based scoring programs and optical scan technology allows faculty to spend more time on student observation, feedback, and problem development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84953494090&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84953494090&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/10401339409539646

DO - 10.1080/10401339409539646

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 64

EP - 67

JO - Teaching and Learning in Medicine

JF - Teaching and Learning in Medicine

SN - 1040-1334

IS - 1

ER -