Inspiring innovation in medical education.

Majka Woods, Leslie Anderson, Mark E. Rosenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traditionally, changes to medical education come from the top down, an approach that potentially misses important contributions from medical students, residents, faculty and staff. In order to provide an avenue for them to bring forward their ideas for educational improvements, the University of Minnesota Medical School sponsored the "What's the Bright Idea?" contest. Through the contest, we sought to foster a culture of innovation and collaboration among faculty, staff and students. The contest included five phases: launch, idea submission, online voting, follow-up and implementation. Seventy-six ideas were submitted, and 902 people participated in the online voting. When asked in a follow-up survey whether the submitter would have developed their idea without the contest, 27% of respondents answered "no" and 18% answered "maybe." Three-fourths stated the contest stimulated networking and collaboration. Four of the recommendations are now being implemented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-48
Number of pages2
JournalMinnesota Medicine
Volume97
Issue number9
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Politics
Medical Education
Medical Staff
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Woods, M., Anderson, L., & Rosenberg, M. E. (2014). Inspiring innovation in medical education. Minnesota Medicine, 97(9), 47-48.

Inspiring innovation in medical education. / Woods, Majka; Anderson, Leslie; Rosenberg, Mark E.

In: Minnesota Medicine, Vol. 97, No. 9, 2014, p. 47-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Woods, M, Anderson, L & Rosenberg, ME 2014, 'Inspiring innovation in medical education.', Minnesota Medicine, vol. 97, no. 9, pp. 47-48.
Woods M, Anderson L, Rosenberg ME. Inspiring innovation in medical education. Minnesota Medicine. 2014;97(9):47-48.
Woods, Majka ; Anderson, Leslie ; Rosenberg, Mark E. / Inspiring innovation in medical education. In: Minnesota Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 97, No. 9. pp. 47-48.
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