Intratumor variability in prognostic indicators may be the cause of conflicting estimates of patient survival and response to therapy

Sam C. Barranco, Roger R. Perry, Mary E. Durm, Alice L. Werner, Sharon G. Gregorcyk, Wade E. Bolton, Courtney Townsend, Courtney M. Townsend

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The DNA index, percentage of S-phase cells, proliferation fraction, and glutathione (GSH) content were determined at more than 1100 separate sites in 140 human tumors and 140 normal tissues. The study showed that the variability was so great from site to site within a tumor that there was only a 61% chance of identifying an aneuploid tumor clone (when present) if only a single site sample was analyzed for DNA content. Similar broad variability was observed in the percentage of S-phase cells, proliferation fraction, and glutathione content. Since these tumor characteristics are often used to predict the outcome of therapy and patient survival, the inaccuracy and underestimation of the test results may cause conflicting or erroneous predictions. The probability of finding an aneuploid clone or elevated percentage of S-phase cells proliferation fraction and GSH content increased dramatically as the number of sample sites studied per tumor was increased. Statistical analyses indicated that in order to achieve a 90% probability that the test results for these parameters were representative of the whole tumor: (a) all single site testing should be abandoned: (b) assays should be performed on samples taken from 3-7 different sites within each tumor; or (c) samples from each tumor should be pooled and the analyses run on a thoroughly mixed or homogenized aliquot of the multisite sample.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5351-5356
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Research
Volume54
Issue number20
StatePublished - Oct 15 1994

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Survival
Neoplasms
S Phase
Cell Proliferation
Aneuploidy
Therapeutics
Glutathione
Clone Cells
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Barranco, S. C., Perry, R. R., Durm, M. E., Werner, A. L., Gregorcyk, S. G., Bolton, W. E., ... Townsend, C. M. (1994). Intratumor variability in prognostic indicators may be the cause of conflicting estimates of patient survival and response to therapy. Cancer Research, 54(20), 5351-5356.

Intratumor variability in prognostic indicators may be the cause of conflicting estimates of patient survival and response to therapy. / Barranco, Sam C.; Perry, Roger R.; Durm, Mary E.; Werner, Alice L.; Gregorcyk, Sharon G.; Bolton, Wade E.; Townsend, Courtney; Townsend, Courtney M.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 54, No. 20, 15.10.1994, p. 5351-5356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barranco, SC, Perry, RR, Durm, ME, Werner, AL, Gregorcyk, SG, Bolton, WE, Townsend, C & Townsend, CM 1994, 'Intratumor variability in prognostic indicators may be the cause of conflicting estimates of patient survival and response to therapy', Cancer Research, vol. 54, no. 20, pp. 5351-5356.
Barranco SC, Perry RR, Durm ME, Werner AL, Gregorcyk SG, Bolton WE et al. Intratumor variability in prognostic indicators may be the cause of conflicting estimates of patient survival and response to therapy. Cancer Research. 1994 Oct 15;54(20):5351-5356.
Barranco, Sam C. ; Perry, Roger R. ; Durm, Mary E. ; Werner, Alice L. ; Gregorcyk, Sharon G. ; Bolton, Wade E. ; Townsend, Courtney ; Townsend, Courtney M. / Intratumor variability in prognostic indicators may be the cause of conflicting estimates of patient survival and response to therapy. In: Cancer Research. 1994 ; Vol. 54, No. 20. pp. 5351-5356.
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