Is there evidence that the outcomes of primary anatomic and reverse shoulder arthroplasty are getting better?

Jeremy S. Somerson, Moni B. Neradilek, Jason E. Hsu, Benjamin C. Service, Albert O. Gee, Frederick A. Matsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Have the results of shoulder arthroplasty got better over the last two decades? To answer this question, we sought published evidence that the patient-reported outcomes and re-operation rates have improved in reports of more recently performed anatomic (TSA) and reverse (RSA) total shoulder arthroplasties. Methods: We analyzed the arthroplasty results among studies published from 1990 to 2015, adjusting for the fact that the different publications presented patient groups with different combinations of diagnoses, used various outcome scales, and had different lengths of follow-up. Results: The adjusted clinical outcomes (p = 0.048), but not the revision rates (p = 0.3), were significantly better for articles reporting more recent TSA procedures. Neither the clinical outcomes (p = 0.9) nor the revision rates (p = 0.4) were significantly better in articles reporting more recent RSA surgeries. Conclusions: Better evidence from reports with greater detail will be necessary to show that patients are realizing progressively better outcomes from shoulder arthroplasty. Level of evidence: Level IV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1235-1244
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Orthopaedics
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Keywords

  • Effect of surgical date
  • Published evidence
  • Revision rates
  • Shoulder arthroplasty outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Is there evidence that the outcomes of primary anatomic and reverse shoulder arthroplasty are getting better?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this