Job satisfaction among academic family physicians

Denny Fe Garcia Agana, Maribeth Porter, Robert Hatch, Daniel Rubin, Peter Carek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Family physicians report some of the highest rates of burnout among their physician peers. Over the past few years, this rate has increased and work-life balance has decreased. In academic medicine, many report lack of career satisfaction and have considered leaving academia. Our aim was to explore the factors that contribute to job satisfaction and burnout in faculty members in a family medicine department. METHODS: Six academic family medicine clinics were invited to participate in this qualitative study. Focus groups were conducted to allow for free-flowing, rich dialogue between the moderator and the physician participants. Transcripts were analyzed in a systematic manner by independent investigators trained in grounded theory. The constant comparison method was used to code and synthesize the qualitative data. RESULTS: Six main themes emerged: time (62%), benefits (9%), resources (8%), undervalue (8%), physician well-being (7%), and practice demand (6%). Within the main theme of time, four subthemes emerged: administrative tasks/emails (61%), teaching (17%), electronic medical records (EMR) requirements (13%), and patient care (9%). CONCLUSIONS: Academic family physicians believe that a main contributor to job satisfaction is time. They desire more resources, like staff, to assist with increasing work demands. Overall, they enjoy the academic primary care environment. Future directions would include identifying the specific time restraints that prevent them from completing tasks, the type of staff that would assist with the work demands, and the life stressors the physicians are experiencing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-625
Number of pages4
JournalFamily medicine
Volume49
Issue number8
StatePublished - Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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  • Cite this

    Agana, D. F. G., Porter, M., Hatch, R., Rubin, D., & Carek, P. (2017). Job satisfaction among academic family physicians. Family medicine, 49(8), 622-625.