Knowledge and prevention practices among U.S. Pregnant immigrants from Zika Virus outbreak areas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Weadministered an anonymous survey to assess knowledge, attitudes, and prevention practices related to the Zika virus among pregnant women residing in Texas. Multivariate logistic regression models controlling for age, race/ethnicity, education, and number of years in the United States assessed differences between women born in outbreak areas (N= 390) versus those born in the United States (N= 249). Results demonstrated that most women wanted more information on the Zika virus and desired to obtain it from their physician. The majority did not know that the Zika virus could be spread through sex with an asymptomatic partner or how often those infected were symptomatic. Few womentook precautions to avoid mosquito bites. Only40%reported frequently using repellent;21%stated that cost was problematic and almost half were concerned about use during pregnancy. Three-fourths stated they would agree to vaccination, if available. Compared with U.S.-born women, those born in outbreak areas were more likely to have already discussed the Zika virus with their doctor (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27, 2.71) and identify microcephaly as the most common birth defect (aOR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.78, 3.76). Moreover, women born in outbreak areas were less likely to desire to keep it a secret if they became infected (aOR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.31, 0.71). This study found that, regardless of birthplace, pregnant womenneed more education on the Zika virus disease and assurance regarding the safety of using repellent during pregnancy. They also need financial assistance for repellent, especially if living in states where transmission by mosquitos has been reported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-162
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Disease Outbreaks
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Culicidae
Logistic Models
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Education
Pregnancy
Microcephaly
Bites and Stings
Pregnant Women
Vaccination
Physicians
Safety
Costs and Cost Analysis
Zika Virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

@article{a27c24e6d64941aeb8ec269bae4f7b63,
title = "Knowledge and prevention practices among U.S. Pregnant immigrants from Zika Virus outbreak areas",
abstract = "Weadministered an anonymous survey to assess knowledge, attitudes, and prevention practices related to the Zika virus among pregnant women residing in Texas. Multivariate logistic regression models controlling for age, race/ethnicity, education, and number of years in the United States assessed differences between women born in outbreak areas (N= 390) versus those born in the United States (N= 249). Results demonstrated that most women wanted more information on the Zika virus and desired to obtain it from their physician. The majority did not know that the Zika virus could be spread through sex with an asymptomatic partner or how often those infected were symptomatic. Few womentook precautions to avoid mosquito bites. Only40{\%}reported frequently using repellent;21{\%}stated that cost was problematic and almost half were concerned about use during pregnancy. Three-fourths stated they would agree to vaccination, if available. Compared with U.S.-born women, those born in outbreak areas were more likely to have already discussed the Zika virus with their doctor (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.86, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 1.27, 2.71) and identify microcephaly as the most common birth defect (aOR = 2.59, 95{\%} CI = 1.78, 3.76). Moreover, women born in outbreak areas were less likely to desire to keep it a secret if they became infected (aOR = 0.47, 95{\%} CI = 0.31, 0.71). This study found that, regardless of birthplace, pregnant womenneed more education on the Zika virus disease and assurance regarding the safety of using repellent during pregnancy. They also need financial assistance for repellent, especially if living in states where transmission by mosquitos has been reported.",
author = "Abbey Berenson and Trinh, {Ha N.} and Jacqueline Hirth and Fangjian Guo and Erika Fuchs and Scott Weaver",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.4269/ajtmh.17-0062",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "97",
pages = "155--162",
journal = "American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
issn = "0002-9637",
publisher = "American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Knowledge and prevention practices among U.S. Pregnant immigrants from Zika Virus outbreak areas

AU - Berenson, Abbey

AU - Trinh, Ha N.

AU - Hirth, Jacqueline

AU - Guo, Fangjian

AU - Fuchs, Erika

AU - Weaver, Scott

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Weadministered an anonymous survey to assess knowledge, attitudes, and prevention practices related to the Zika virus among pregnant women residing in Texas. Multivariate logistic regression models controlling for age, race/ethnicity, education, and number of years in the United States assessed differences between women born in outbreak areas (N= 390) versus those born in the United States (N= 249). Results demonstrated that most women wanted more information on the Zika virus and desired to obtain it from their physician. The majority did not know that the Zika virus could be spread through sex with an asymptomatic partner or how often those infected were symptomatic. Few womentook precautions to avoid mosquito bites. Only40%reported frequently using repellent;21%stated that cost was problematic and almost half were concerned about use during pregnancy. Three-fourths stated they would agree to vaccination, if available. Compared with U.S.-born women, those born in outbreak areas were more likely to have already discussed the Zika virus with their doctor (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27, 2.71) and identify microcephaly as the most common birth defect (aOR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.78, 3.76). Moreover, women born in outbreak areas were less likely to desire to keep it a secret if they became infected (aOR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.31, 0.71). This study found that, regardless of birthplace, pregnant womenneed more education on the Zika virus disease and assurance regarding the safety of using repellent during pregnancy. They also need financial assistance for repellent, especially if living in states where transmission by mosquitos has been reported.

AB - Weadministered an anonymous survey to assess knowledge, attitudes, and prevention practices related to the Zika virus among pregnant women residing in Texas. Multivariate logistic regression models controlling for age, race/ethnicity, education, and number of years in the United States assessed differences between women born in outbreak areas (N= 390) versus those born in the United States (N= 249). Results demonstrated that most women wanted more information on the Zika virus and desired to obtain it from their physician. The majority did not know that the Zika virus could be spread through sex with an asymptomatic partner or how often those infected were symptomatic. Few womentook precautions to avoid mosquito bites. Only40%reported frequently using repellent;21%stated that cost was problematic and almost half were concerned about use during pregnancy. Three-fourths stated they would agree to vaccination, if available. Compared with U.S.-born women, those born in outbreak areas were more likely to have already discussed the Zika virus with their doctor (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27, 2.71) and identify microcephaly as the most common birth defect (aOR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.78, 3.76). Moreover, women born in outbreak areas were less likely to desire to keep it a secret if they became infected (aOR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.31, 0.71). This study found that, regardless of birthplace, pregnant womenneed more education on the Zika virus disease and assurance regarding the safety of using repellent during pregnancy. They also need financial assistance for repellent, especially if living in states where transmission by mosquitos has been reported.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85024392488&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85024392488&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0062

DO - 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0062

M3 - Article

VL - 97

SP - 155

EP - 162

JO - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

JF - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

SN - 0002-9637

IS - 1

ER -