Laboratory diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever

David Walker, M. S. Burday, J. D. Folds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To examine the use of the laboratory in the diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever and to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the Weil-Felix test, hemagglutination, complement fixation, and skin biopsy immunofluorescence in the hospital, we reviewed our experience during the year 1978. Sera were submitted from 142 patients and skin biopsies from 16 patients suspected of having RMSF. Sensitivity rates of methods in the acute phase were skin biopsy, 70%; Proteus OX-19 agglutination, 65%; hemagglutination, 19%; Proteus OX-2 agglutination, 18%; and CF, 0%. Overall specificity rates were skin biopsy, 100%; hemagglutination, 99%; and agglutination of Proteus OX-2 96% and OX-19 78%. Major problems were failure to submit convalescent serum and nonspecificity of Weil-Felix titer of 1:160. Two cases illustrate the importance of skin biopsy and serologic results. Immunofluorescent examination of skin biopsies for Rickettsia rickettsii is the best procedure currently available for early diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1443-1446+1449
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume73
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1980
Externally publishedYes

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Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
Clinical Laboratory Techniques
Biopsy
Skin
Proteus
Agglutination
Hemagglutination
Rickettsia rickettsii
Complement Fixation Tests
Serum
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Early Diagnosis
Sensitivity and Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Walker, D., Burday, M. S., & Folds, J. D. (1980). Laboratory diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Southern Medical Journal, 73(11), 1443-1446+1449.

Laboratory diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. / Walker, David; Burday, M. S.; Folds, J. D.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 73, No. 11, 1980, p. 1443-1446+1449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walker, D, Burday, MS & Folds, JD 1980, 'Laboratory diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever', Southern Medical Journal, vol. 73, no. 11, pp. 1443-1446+1449.
Walker, David ; Burday, M. S. ; Folds, J. D. / Laboratory diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. In: Southern Medical Journal. 1980 ; Vol. 73, No. 11. pp. 1443-1446+1449.
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