Laboratory testing of femoral venous cannulae

Effect of size, position and negative pressure on flow

Mark Kurusz, Donald J. Deyo, Alina D. Sholar, Weike Tao, Joseph B. Zwischenberger

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Femoral venous cannulae (17-28 French) were tested to compare flows obtained by their placement in a simulated inferior vena cava (IVC) or right atrium (RA) and by varying drainage pressures using gravity siphon drainage or a centrifugal pump in the venous line. The circuit consisted of conventional tubing and equipment including a segment of thin-walled latex tubing to simulate the IVC connected to a flexible reservoir to simulate the RA. The test fluid was a 40% glycerin solution. Flow was measured at height differentials of 30-60 cm (cannula-to-inlet of hard-shell venous reservoir) and with a -10 to -80 mmHg negative pressure created by the centrifugal pump. A roller pump returned the test fluid to a flexible bag to maintain a filling pressure of 0-1 mmHg. Flow increased modestly with an increasing height differential. When negative pressure was applied with the centrifugal pump, flow increased 10% and 18% (IVC and RA positions, respectively) compared to gravity siphon drainage conditions. There also was a tendency for flow to plateau or cease when the centrifugal pump was used at higher levels of negative pressure or when larger cannulae were used. We conclude: (1) position of smaller cannulae in the RA yield better flows than when the cannulae are larger and placed in the IVC; (2) smaller-sized cannulae are capable of achieving higher flows when the centrifugal pump is used; (3) cannulae must be properly positioned to achieve maximum flow, (4) the centrifugal pump will augment flow, but should be regulated to avoid extreme negative pressures; and (5) cannula design has no demonstrable effect on flow.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)379-387
    Number of pages9
    JournalPerfusion
    Volume14
    Issue number5
    StatePublished - 1999

    Fingerprint

    Centrifugal pumps
    Thigh
    Pressure
    Inferior Vena Cava
    Testing
    Heart Atria
    Drainage
    Siphons
    Tubing
    Gravitation
    Fluids
    Latexes
    Glycerol
    Vascular Access Devices
    Cannula
    Latex
    Pumps
    Networks (circuits)
    Equipment and Supplies

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Kurusz, M., Deyo, D. J., Sholar, A. D., Tao, W., & Zwischenberger, J. B. (1999). Laboratory testing of femoral venous cannulae: Effect of size, position and negative pressure on flow. Perfusion, 14(5), 379-387.

    Laboratory testing of femoral venous cannulae : Effect of size, position and negative pressure on flow. / Kurusz, Mark; Deyo, Donald J.; Sholar, Alina D.; Tao, Weike; Zwischenberger, Joseph B.

    In: Perfusion, Vol. 14, No. 5, 1999, p. 379-387.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kurusz, M, Deyo, DJ, Sholar, AD, Tao, W & Zwischenberger, JB 1999, 'Laboratory testing of femoral venous cannulae: Effect of size, position and negative pressure on flow', Perfusion, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 379-387.
    Kurusz M, Deyo DJ, Sholar AD, Tao W, Zwischenberger JB. Laboratory testing of femoral venous cannulae: Effect of size, position and negative pressure on flow. Perfusion. 1999;14(5):379-387.
    Kurusz, Mark ; Deyo, Donald J. ; Sholar, Alina D. ; Tao, Weike ; Zwischenberger, Joseph B. / Laboratory testing of femoral venous cannulae : Effect of size, position and negative pressure on flow. In: Perfusion. 1999 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 379-387.
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