Lack of evidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (Sars-cov-2) spillover in free-living neotropical non-human primates, brazil

Lívia Sacchetto, Bárbara Aparecida Chaves, Edson Rodrigues Costa, Aline Souza de Menezes Medeiros, Marcelo Gordo, Danielle Bastos Araújo, Danielle Bruna Leal Oliveira, Ana Paula Betaressi da Silva, Andréia Francesli Negri, Edison Luiz Durigon, Kathryn A. Hanley, Nikos Vasilakis, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de Lacerda, Maurício Lacerda Nogueira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is responsible for the worst pandemic of the 21st century. Like all human coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 originated in a wildlife reservoir, most likely from bats. As SARS-CoV-2 has spread across the globe in humans, it has spilled over to infect a variety of non-human animal species in domestic, farm, and zoo settings. Additionally, a broad range of species, including one neotropical monkey, have proven to be susceptible to experimental infection with SARS-CoV-2. Together, these findings raise the specter of establishment of novel enzootic cycles of SARS-COV-2. To assess the potential exposure of free-living non-human primates to SARS-COV-2, we sampled 60 neotropical monkeys living in proximity to Manaus and São José do Rio Preto, two hotspots for COVID-19 in Brazil. Our molecular and serological tests detected no evidence of SAR-CoV-2 infection among these populations. While this result is reassuring, sustained surveillance efforts of wildlife living in close association with human populations is warranted, given the stochastic nature of spillover events and the enormous implications of SARS-CoV-2 spillover for human health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1933
JournalViruses
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Coronavirus
  • Emerging virus
  • Non-human primates
  • Spillback

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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