Lack of type I interferon signaling ameliorates respiratory syncytial virus-induced lung inflammation and restores antioxidant defenses

Maria Ansar, Yue Qu, Teodora Ivanciuc, Roberto P. Garofalo, Antonella Casola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in mouse and human lung is associated with pathogenic inflammation and oxidative injury. RSV impairs antioxidant responses by increasing the degradation of transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2), which controls the expression of several antioxidant enzymes (AOEs). In addition to its protective effects, type I IFNs have been increasingly recognized as important mediators of host pathogenic responses during acute respiratory viral infections. We used a mouse model of RSV infection to investigate the effect of lack of type I interferon (IFN) receptor on viral-mediated clinical disease, airway inflammation, NRF2 expression, and antioxidant defenses. In the absence of type I IFN signaling, RSV-infected mice showed significantly less body weight loss and airway obstruction, as well as a significant reduction in cytokine and chemokine secretion and airway inflammation. Lack of type I IFN receptor was associated with greatly reduced virus-induced promyelocytic leukemia lung protein expression, which we showed to be necessary for virus-induced NRF2 degradation in a cell model of infection, resulting in restoration of NRF2 levels, AOE expression, and airway antioxidant capacity. Our data support the concept that modulation of type I IFN production and/or signaling could represent an important therapeutic strategy to ameliorate severity of RSV-induced lung disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number67
JournalAntioxidants
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Antioxidant enzymes
  • Inflammation
  • NRF2
  • PML
  • Respiratory syncytial virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Lack of type I interferon signaling ameliorates respiratory syncytial virus-induced lung inflammation and restores antioxidant defenses'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this