Lactate dehydrogenase as a marker of nasopharyngeal inflammatory injury during viral upper respiratory infection: Implications for acute otitis media

Linda C. Ede, James O'Brien, Tasnee Chonmaitree, Yimei Han, Janak A. Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Acute otitis media (AOM) is a frequent complication of viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI). We hypothesized that the severity of nasopharyngeal cellular injury during URI, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentrations in nasopharyngeal secretions (NPSs), is related to AOM complication.Methods:LDH concentrations were determined in NPS samples (n = 594) that were collected at the initial visit for URI from 183 children who were followed for the development of AOM. A subset of NPS samples (n = 134) was analyzed for interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-concentrations.Results:AOM complication was independently predicted by LDH concentrations (median mU/ml with AOM = 2,438 vs. without AOM = 1,573; estimate = 0.276; P = 0.02). LDH effect on AOM development was highest during the first 4 d of URI. LDH concentrations were higher in URIs due to adenoviruses, bocaviruses, and rhinoviruses as compared with virus-negative samples (P < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between concentrations of LDH and all cytokines (P < 0.001).Conclusion:LDH concentrations in NPS are positively associated with AOM risk, suggesting that the severity of nasopharyngeal inflammatory injury during URI contributes to the development of AOM and that reduction of inflammatory injury may reduce the risk for AOM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-354
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Research
Volume73
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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