Lag time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis in Venezuelan patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Elaudi Rodríguez-Polanco, Soham Al Snih al snih, Yong Fang Kuo, Alberto Millán, Martín A. Rodríguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective study in a hospital-based sample of Venezuelan patients with rheumatoid arthritis was made to estimate the lag time between onset of symptoms, diagnosis, and initiation of DMARD treatment. Medical records and in-person interview of patients to fill in a questionnaire collecting information on demographics and initiation of symptoms, first consultation with any physician, time of diagnosis, and initiation of first disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug were reviewed. We performed descriptive statistics and multivariable linear regression analysis. Mean lag time between symptom onset and diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis was 40.5 months (range 1-424). Mean lag time between onset of symptoms and first consultation with a physician and between first consultation and diagnosis was 16.3 and 23.9 months, respectively. Mean lag time between onset of symptoms and initiation of DMARD treatment was 56.9 months. A definitive diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis was done by a rheumatologist in 251 patients (92.3%). First consultation with an orthopedist or a primary care physician, first consultation in a public versus a private health center, and diagnosis before 2000 were associated with longer lag time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Venezuelan patients with rheumatoid arthritis had a marked delay from disease onset to diagnosis and initiation of first DMARD. First consultation with an orthopedist and consultation in a public versus a private health center were the variables with the strongest effect on lag time to diagnosis and to initiation of first DMARD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-665
Number of pages9
JournalRheumatology International
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Rheumatoid Arthritis
Antirheumatic Agents
Referral and Consultation
Physicians
Health
Primary Care Physicians
Medical Records
Linear Models
Retrospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Demography
Interviews
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Diagnosis delay
  • Hispanic
  • Lag times
  • RA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Lag time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis in Venezuelan patients with rheumatoid arthritis. / Rodríguez-Polanco, Elaudi; Al Snih al snih, Soham; Kuo, Yong Fang; Millán, Alberto; Rodríguez, Martín A.

In: Rheumatology International, Vol. 31, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 657-665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodríguez-Polanco, Elaudi ; Al Snih al snih, Soham ; Kuo, Yong Fang ; Millán, Alberto ; Rodríguez, Martín A. / Lag time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis in Venezuelan patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In: Rheumatology International. 2011 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 657-665.
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