Laryngopharyngeal reflux disease in children

Naren N. Venkatesan, Harold Pine, Michael Underbrink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extraesophageal reflux disease, commonly called laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD), continues to be an entity with more questions than answers. Although the role of LPRD has been implicated in various pediatric diseases, it has been inadequately studied in others. LPRD is believed to contribute to failure to thrive, laryngomalacia, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, chronic cough, hoarseness, esophagitis, and aspiration among other pathologies. Thus, LPRD should be considered as a chronic disease with a variety of presentations. High clinical suspicion along with consultation with an otolaryngologist, who can evaluate for laryngeal findings, is necessary to accurately diagnose LPRD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)865-878
Number of pages14
JournalPediatric Clinics of North America
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Laryngopharyngeal Reflux
Laryngomalacia
Hoarseness
Failure to Thrive
Esophagitis
Cough
Chronic Disease
Referral and Consultation
Pediatrics
Pathology

Keywords

  • Diagnosis
  • Extraesophageal reflux disease
  • Laryngopharyngeal reflux disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Laryngopharyngeal reflux disease in children. / Venkatesan, Naren N.; Pine, Harold; Underbrink, Michael.

In: Pediatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 60, No. 4, 08.2013, p. 865-878.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Venkatesan, Naren N. ; Pine, Harold ; Underbrink, Michael. / Laryngopharyngeal reflux disease in children. In: Pediatric Clinics of North America. 2013 ; Vol. 60, No. 4. pp. 865-878.
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