Laser fluence for permanent damage of cutaneous blood vessels

Jennifer Kehlet Barton, Gracie Vargas, T. Joshua Pfefer, Ashley J. Welch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Treatment of vascular disorders may be improved by a more thorough understanding of laser-blood vessel interaction. In this study, the probability of permanent damage to a given type and size of blood vessel was determined as a function of fluence at the top (superficial edge) of the vessel lumen. A 532 nm wavelength, 10 ms pulse duration, 3 mm spot size laser was used to perform approximately 250 irradiations of subdermal blood vessels in the hamster dorsal skin flap preparation. The radiant exposure required for a 50% probability of permanent damage was calculated using a probit analysis of experimental results. Threshold radiant exposure increased with larger blood vessel diameters and was greater for arterioles than venules. Monte Carlo modeling of a typical blood vessel geometry revealed that fluence at the top of the blood vessel lumen was amplified by a factor of approximately 2.4 over tissue surface radiant exposure, due to light scattering in the tissue and internal reflection at the skin-air interfaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)916-920
Number of pages5
JournalPhotochemistry and Photobiology
Volume70
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

blood vessels
Blood vessels
Blood Vessels
fluence
Lasers
damage
Skin
lasers
lumens
arterioles
Tissue
hamsters
Venules
Light scattering
Arterioles
vessels
Laser pulses
Cricetinae
pulse duration
light scattering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Barton, J. K., Vargas, G., Pfefer, T. J., & Welch, A. J. (1999). Laser fluence for permanent damage of cutaneous blood vessels. Photochemistry and Photobiology, 70(6), 916-920.

Laser fluence for permanent damage of cutaneous blood vessels. / Barton, Jennifer Kehlet; Vargas, Gracie; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Welch, Ashley J.

In: Photochemistry and Photobiology, Vol. 70, No. 6, 12.1999, p. 916-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barton, JK, Vargas, G, Pfefer, TJ & Welch, AJ 1999, 'Laser fluence for permanent damage of cutaneous blood vessels', Photochemistry and Photobiology, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 916-920.
Barton, Jennifer Kehlet ; Vargas, Gracie ; Pfefer, T. Joshua ; Welch, Ashley J. / Laser fluence for permanent damage of cutaneous blood vessels. In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. 1999 ; Vol. 70, No. 6. pp. 916-920.
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