Laser in situ keratomileusis for primary hyperopia

George J C Jin, W. Andrew Lyle, Kevin Merkley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, predictability, stability, and safety of hyperopic laser in situ keratomileusis (H-LASIK) over a 24-month period and analyze topographic changes after H-LASIK to assess topographic pseudokeratectasia (TPKE) following H-LASIK. Setting: Eye Institute of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Methods: This prospective study included 139 eyes of 77 patients having H-LASIK for primary hyperopia. The mean follow-up was 15.6 months ± 7.6 (SD) (range 6 to 48 months). One hundred twenty-two eyes (88%) were followed at 1 year and 36 eyes (26%) at 24 months. Topographic pseudokeratectasia was defined as 1 or more positive keratoconus screening findings in an eye with topographic central or inferior steepening detected by the Topography Modeling System but without corneal thinning or progressive change. Results: The mean spherical equivalent manifest refraction was +2.39 ± 0.99 diopter (D) preoperatively and -0.05 ± 0.61 D at the last visit. Ninety-one percent of eyes were within ±1.00 D of emmetropia and 71% of the eyes were within ±0.50 D. Uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better was present in 42%, 20/25 in 63%, and 20/40 or better in 93% of eyes. Loss of 2 lines of BSCVA occurred in 2 eyes (1.4%). In 1 eye, ischemic optic neuropathy occurred, and in another, choroidal neovascularization developed postoperatively. Topographic pseudokeratectasia was detected in 28% to 56% of eyes postoperatively. No significant difference between postoperative visual and refractive outcome, regression, or irregularity was found between the eyes with or without TPKE. Conclusion: Hyperopic LASIK appears to be an effective, predictable, and safe procedure to correct low to moderate primary hyperopia. Topographic pseudokeratectasia, which was observed after H-LASIK with a keratoconus-like topographic pattern in otherwise normal eyes, may represent a relatively static condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)776-784
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hyperopia
Laser In Situ Keratomileusis
Keratoconus
Emmetropia
Ischemic Optic Neuropathy
Choroidal Neovascularization
Visual Acuity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Laser in situ keratomileusis for primary hyperopia. / Jin, George J C; Lyle, W. Andrew; Merkley, Kevin.

In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Vol. 31, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 776-784.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jin, George J C ; Lyle, W. Andrew ; Merkley, Kevin. / Laser in situ keratomileusis for primary hyperopia. In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. 2005 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 776-784.
@article{981a60f2cd624875bbb518431578b00f,
title = "Laser in situ keratomileusis for primary hyperopia",
abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, predictability, stability, and safety of hyperopic laser in situ keratomileusis (H-LASIK) over a 24-month period and analyze topographic changes after H-LASIK to assess topographic pseudokeratectasia (TPKE) following H-LASIK. Setting: Eye Institute of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Methods: This prospective study included 139 eyes of 77 patients having H-LASIK for primary hyperopia. The mean follow-up was 15.6 months ± 7.6 (SD) (range 6 to 48 months). One hundred twenty-two eyes (88{\%}) were followed at 1 year and 36 eyes (26{\%}) at 24 months. Topographic pseudokeratectasia was defined as 1 or more positive keratoconus screening findings in an eye with topographic central or inferior steepening detected by the Topography Modeling System but without corneal thinning or progressive change. Results: The mean spherical equivalent manifest refraction was +2.39 ± 0.99 diopter (D) preoperatively and -0.05 ± 0.61 D at the last visit. Ninety-one percent of eyes were within ±1.00 D of emmetropia and 71{\%} of the eyes were within ±0.50 D. Uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better was present in 42{\%}, 20/25 in 63{\%}, and 20/40 or better in 93{\%} of eyes. Loss of 2 lines of BSCVA occurred in 2 eyes (1.4{\%}). In 1 eye, ischemic optic neuropathy occurred, and in another, choroidal neovascularization developed postoperatively. Topographic pseudokeratectasia was detected in 28{\%} to 56{\%} of eyes postoperatively. No significant difference between postoperative visual and refractive outcome, regression, or irregularity was found between the eyes with or without TPKE. Conclusion: Hyperopic LASIK appears to be an effective, predictable, and safe procedure to correct low to moderate primary hyperopia. Topographic pseudokeratectasia, which was observed after H-LASIK with a keratoconus-like topographic pattern in otherwise normal eyes, may represent a relatively static condition.",
author = "Jin, {George J C} and Lyle, {W. Andrew} and Kevin Merkley",
year = "2005",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.jcrs.2004.08.052",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "776--784",
journal = "Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery",
issn = "0886-3350",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Laser in situ keratomileusis for primary hyperopia

AU - Jin, George J C

AU - Lyle, W. Andrew

AU - Merkley, Kevin

PY - 2005/4

Y1 - 2005/4

N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, predictability, stability, and safety of hyperopic laser in situ keratomileusis (H-LASIK) over a 24-month period and analyze topographic changes after H-LASIK to assess topographic pseudokeratectasia (TPKE) following H-LASIK. Setting: Eye Institute of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Methods: This prospective study included 139 eyes of 77 patients having H-LASIK for primary hyperopia. The mean follow-up was 15.6 months ± 7.6 (SD) (range 6 to 48 months). One hundred twenty-two eyes (88%) were followed at 1 year and 36 eyes (26%) at 24 months. Topographic pseudokeratectasia was defined as 1 or more positive keratoconus screening findings in an eye with topographic central or inferior steepening detected by the Topography Modeling System but without corneal thinning or progressive change. Results: The mean spherical equivalent manifest refraction was +2.39 ± 0.99 diopter (D) preoperatively and -0.05 ± 0.61 D at the last visit. Ninety-one percent of eyes were within ±1.00 D of emmetropia and 71% of the eyes were within ±0.50 D. Uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better was present in 42%, 20/25 in 63%, and 20/40 or better in 93% of eyes. Loss of 2 lines of BSCVA occurred in 2 eyes (1.4%). In 1 eye, ischemic optic neuropathy occurred, and in another, choroidal neovascularization developed postoperatively. Topographic pseudokeratectasia was detected in 28% to 56% of eyes postoperatively. No significant difference between postoperative visual and refractive outcome, regression, or irregularity was found between the eyes with or without TPKE. Conclusion: Hyperopic LASIK appears to be an effective, predictable, and safe procedure to correct low to moderate primary hyperopia. Topographic pseudokeratectasia, which was observed after H-LASIK with a keratoconus-like topographic pattern in otherwise normal eyes, may represent a relatively static condition.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, predictability, stability, and safety of hyperopic laser in situ keratomileusis (H-LASIK) over a 24-month period and analyze topographic changes after H-LASIK to assess topographic pseudokeratectasia (TPKE) following H-LASIK. Setting: Eye Institute of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Methods: This prospective study included 139 eyes of 77 patients having H-LASIK for primary hyperopia. The mean follow-up was 15.6 months ± 7.6 (SD) (range 6 to 48 months). One hundred twenty-two eyes (88%) were followed at 1 year and 36 eyes (26%) at 24 months. Topographic pseudokeratectasia was defined as 1 or more positive keratoconus screening findings in an eye with topographic central or inferior steepening detected by the Topography Modeling System but without corneal thinning or progressive change. Results: The mean spherical equivalent manifest refraction was +2.39 ± 0.99 diopter (D) preoperatively and -0.05 ± 0.61 D at the last visit. Ninety-one percent of eyes were within ±1.00 D of emmetropia and 71% of the eyes were within ±0.50 D. Uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better was present in 42%, 20/25 in 63%, and 20/40 or better in 93% of eyes. Loss of 2 lines of BSCVA occurred in 2 eyes (1.4%). In 1 eye, ischemic optic neuropathy occurred, and in another, choroidal neovascularization developed postoperatively. Topographic pseudokeratectasia was detected in 28% to 56% of eyes postoperatively. No significant difference between postoperative visual and refractive outcome, regression, or irregularity was found between the eyes with or without TPKE. Conclusion: Hyperopic LASIK appears to be an effective, predictable, and safe procedure to correct low to moderate primary hyperopia. Topographic pseudokeratectasia, which was observed after H-LASIK with a keratoconus-like topographic pattern in otherwise normal eyes, may represent a relatively static condition.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=19344374628&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=19344374628&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcrs.2004.08.052

DO - 10.1016/j.jcrs.2004.08.052

M3 - Article

C2 - 15899456

AN - SCOPUS:19344374628

VL - 31

SP - 776

EP - 784

JO - Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery

JF - Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery

SN - 0886-3350

IS - 4

ER -