Laser in situ keratomileusis versus lens-based surgery for correcting residual refractive error after cataract surgery

George J C Jin, Kevin Merkley, Alan S. Crandall, Yian Jin Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) versus lens-based surgery (intraocular lens [IOL] exchange or piggyback IOL) for correcting residual refractive error after cataract surgery. Setting: Private eye center, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Methods: This retrospective study included 57 eyes of 48 patients who had LASIK (28 eyes) or lens-based correction (29 eyes) for residual refractive error after cataract surgery. The visual and refractive outcomes were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 20 to 24 months. Results: In the LASIK group, the mean spherical equivalent (SE) was reduced from -1.62 ± 0.80 diopters (D) preoperatively to +0.05 ± 0.38 D postoperatively in myopic eyes and from +0.51 ± 1.25 D to +0.19 ± 0.35 D in hyperopic eyes. Ninety-two percent of eyes were within ±0.50 D of intended correction. In the lens group, the mean SE was reduced from -3.55 ± 2.69 D preoperatively to -0.20 ± 0.50 D postoperatively in myopic eyes and from +2.07 ± 2.38 D to +0.07 ± 0.85 D in hyperopic eyes. Eighty-one percent of eyes had postoperative SE within ±0.50 D of the intended correction. The UCVA improved significantly in both groups. No eye lost more than 1 line of BSCVA. With a similar length of follow-up, no significant difference in postoperative SE was found between the 2 groups (P = .453). Conclusions: The results showed efficacy, safety, predictability, and merits of LASIK and lens-based approaches for correcting different types of residual refractive error after cataract surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)562-569
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Laser In Situ Keratomileusis
Refractive Errors
Cataract
Lenses
Intraocular Lenses
Safety
Crystalline Lens
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Laser in situ keratomileusis versus lens-based surgery for correcting residual refractive error after cataract surgery. / Jin, George J C; Merkley, Kevin; Crandall, Alan S.; Jin Jones, Yian.

In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Vol. 34, No. 4, 04.2008, p. 562-569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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