Late-life immigration, changes in living arrangements, and headship status among older Mexican-origin individuals

Jacqueline L. Angel, Ronald J. Angel, Kyriakos Markides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. In this study we first examine for Mexican Americans aged 65 or older the correlates of changes in living arrangements over a two-year period with special focus on the age at migration to the United States; and second, determine the predictors of headship status at the end of that period. Methods. We employ the 1993-95 Hispanic-EPESE (Established Population for Epidemiological Studies of the Elderly), a longitudinal data set that contains a representative sample of 3,050 older Mexican Americans residing in the Southwestern United States. Results. The results show that individuals who immigrate after age 50 are more likely to move in with others rather than have someone move in with them, especially when they become ill. Conclusions. The social policy implications of the recent eligibility restrictions on long-term care services and supports for older Mexican American immigrants and their families are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-403
Number of pages15
JournalSocial Science Quarterly
Volume81
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2000

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life situation
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Late-life immigration, changes in living arrangements, and headship status among older Mexican-origin individuals. / Angel, Jacqueline L.; Angel, Ronald J.; Markides, Kyriakos.

In: Social Science Quarterly, Vol. 81, No. 1, 2000, p. 389-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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