Learning the available and supplied religious facilities for inpatient services: an example of Taiwan's hospital environment.

Chang Yi Yin, Huey-Ming Tzeng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Holistic nursing care is typically defined to include the assessment and support of a patient's religious background to respect his/her beliefs and promote coping with illness, rehabilitation, and/or dying. An assessment of Taiwanese hospitals reveals variation in the policies and environment supporting religious practices. The survey of nursing executives revealed that only 40% of hospitals had any facilities for religious service or prayer and only 4% employed a chaplain or recruited volunteers to provide religious support. Approximately 20% of hospitals did provide a room for special ceremonies, often used for rituals after patient death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-173
Number of pages7
JournalNursing economic$
Volume25
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Taiwan
Inpatients
Learning
Holistic Nursing
Clergy
Ceremonial Behavior
Religion
Nursing Care
Volunteers
Nursing
Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management

Cite this

Learning the available and supplied religious facilities for inpatient services : an example of Taiwan's hospital environment. / Yin, Chang Yi; Tzeng, Huey-Ming.

In: Nursing economic$, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.01.2007, p. 167-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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