Leishmaniasis in Colombia. I. Studies on the phlebotomine fauna associated with endemic foci in the Pacific Coast region

Bruno Travi, J. Montoya, Y. Solarte, L. Lozano, C. Jaramillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies on the phlebotomine fauna related to the leishmaniasis endemic foci of the Colombian Pacific Coast were carried out in the municipalities of Tumaco and Buenaventura. In Inguapi del Guadual, Tumaco. Lutzomyia trapidoi and Lu. gomezi were the predominant anthropophilic species; Lu. panamensis and Lu. hartmanni were less frequent. In Bajo Calima, Buenaventura, Lu. trapidoi represented over 94% of the anthropophilic sandflies. Continuous sampling from 1800 to 0600 hours in Inguapi del Guadual demonstrated that Lu. trapidoi bites mainly at dusk and dawn whereas Lu. gomezi remains active throughout the night. In Inguapi de Guadual, promastigotes were found in 0.1% (2/2,305) of Lu. trapidoi, 0.2% (3/140) of Lu. gomezi, and 0.2% (1/424) of Lu. panamensis samples collected. In Bajo Calima, 1.9% (8/429) of Lu. trapidoi were found to be infected. Leishmania braziliensis panamensis, the most common Leishmania subspecies in the human population of this endemic focus, was isolated from 1 Lu. trapidoi from Inguapi del Guadual. Parasitological and entomological findings suggest that Lu. trapidoi could be the main vector of Leishmania in these areas, although Lu. gomezi and Lu. panamensis were also predominant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-266
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume39
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Psychodidae
Leishmaniasis
Colombia
Leishmania
Leishmania braziliensis
Bites and Stings
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Leishmaniasis in Colombia. I. Studies on the phlebotomine fauna associated with endemic foci in the Pacific Coast region. / Travi, Bruno; Montoya, J.; Solarte, Y.; Lozano, L.; Jaramillo, C.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 39, No. 3, 1988, p. 261-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{49cfe36cd15c4c1c8414ce6cf49b11d1,
title = "Leishmaniasis in Colombia. I. Studies on the phlebotomine fauna associated with endemic foci in the Pacific Coast region",
abstract = "Studies on the phlebotomine fauna related to the leishmaniasis endemic foci of the Colombian Pacific Coast were carried out in the municipalities of Tumaco and Buenaventura. In Inguapi del Guadual, Tumaco. Lutzomyia trapidoi and Lu. gomezi were the predominant anthropophilic species; Lu. panamensis and Lu. hartmanni were less frequent. In Bajo Calima, Buenaventura, Lu. trapidoi represented over 94{\%} of the anthropophilic sandflies. Continuous sampling from 1800 to 0600 hours in Inguapi del Guadual demonstrated that Lu. trapidoi bites mainly at dusk and dawn whereas Lu. gomezi remains active throughout the night. In Inguapi de Guadual, promastigotes were found in 0.1{\%} (2/2,305) of Lu. trapidoi, 0.2{\%} (3/140) of Lu. gomezi, and 0.2{\%} (1/424) of Lu. panamensis samples collected. In Bajo Calima, 1.9{\%} (8/429) of Lu. trapidoi were found to be infected. Leishmania braziliensis panamensis, the most common Leishmania subspecies in the human population of this endemic focus, was isolated from 1 Lu. trapidoi from Inguapi del Guadual. Parasitological and entomological findings suggest that Lu. trapidoi could be the main vector of Leishmania in these areas, although Lu. gomezi and Lu. panamensis were also predominant.",
author = "Bruno Travi and J. Montoya and Y. Solarte and L. Lozano and C. Jaramillo",
year = "1988",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "261--266",
journal = "American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
issn = "0002-9637",
publisher = "American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Leishmaniasis in Colombia. I. Studies on the phlebotomine fauna associated with endemic foci in the Pacific Coast region

AU - Travi, Bruno

AU - Montoya, J.

AU - Solarte, Y.

AU - Lozano, L.

AU - Jaramillo, C.

PY - 1988

Y1 - 1988

N2 - Studies on the phlebotomine fauna related to the leishmaniasis endemic foci of the Colombian Pacific Coast were carried out in the municipalities of Tumaco and Buenaventura. In Inguapi del Guadual, Tumaco. Lutzomyia trapidoi and Lu. gomezi were the predominant anthropophilic species; Lu. panamensis and Lu. hartmanni were less frequent. In Bajo Calima, Buenaventura, Lu. trapidoi represented over 94% of the anthropophilic sandflies. Continuous sampling from 1800 to 0600 hours in Inguapi del Guadual demonstrated that Lu. trapidoi bites mainly at dusk and dawn whereas Lu. gomezi remains active throughout the night. In Inguapi de Guadual, promastigotes were found in 0.1% (2/2,305) of Lu. trapidoi, 0.2% (3/140) of Lu. gomezi, and 0.2% (1/424) of Lu. panamensis samples collected. In Bajo Calima, 1.9% (8/429) of Lu. trapidoi were found to be infected. Leishmania braziliensis panamensis, the most common Leishmania subspecies in the human population of this endemic focus, was isolated from 1 Lu. trapidoi from Inguapi del Guadual. Parasitological and entomological findings suggest that Lu. trapidoi could be the main vector of Leishmania in these areas, although Lu. gomezi and Lu. panamensis were also predominant.

AB - Studies on the phlebotomine fauna related to the leishmaniasis endemic foci of the Colombian Pacific Coast were carried out in the municipalities of Tumaco and Buenaventura. In Inguapi del Guadual, Tumaco. Lutzomyia trapidoi and Lu. gomezi were the predominant anthropophilic species; Lu. panamensis and Lu. hartmanni were less frequent. In Bajo Calima, Buenaventura, Lu. trapidoi represented over 94% of the anthropophilic sandflies. Continuous sampling from 1800 to 0600 hours in Inguapi del Guadual demonstrated that Lu. trapidoi bites mainly at dusk and dawn whereas Lu. gomezi remains active throughout the night. In Inguapi de Guadual, promastigotes were found in 0.1% (2/2,305) of Lu. trapidoi, 0.2% (3/140) of Lu. gomezi, and 0.2% (1/424) of Lu. panamensis samples collected. In Bajo Calima, 1.9% (8/429) of Lu. trapidoi were found to be infected. Leishmania braziliensis panamensis, the most common Leishmania subspecies in the human population of this endemic focus, was isolated from 1 Lu. trapidoi from Inguapi del Guadual. Parasitological and entomological findings suggest that Lu. trapidoi could be the main vector of Leishmania in these areas, although Lu. gomezi and Lu. panamensis were also predominant.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023708339&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023708339&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 261

EP - 266

JO - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

JF - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

SN - 0002-9637

IS - 3

ER -