Lifetime inhalant use among alternative high school students in Texas: Prevalence and characteristics of users

Melissa A. Fleschler, Susan R. Tortolero, Elizabeth R. Baumler, Sally W. Vernon, Nancy F. Weller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

This cross-sectional study describes the prevalence of lifetime inhalant use and identifies demographic, psychosocial, and other risk behavior characteristics of students reporting lifetime inhalant use. The sample consisted of 354 students attending alternative high schools (dropout prevention/recovery schools) in Texas. The prevalence of lifetime inhalant use was 27.7%. After controlling for potentially confounding factors, students reporting lifetime inhalant use were less likely to be financially supported by their parents/guardians, more likely to use alcohol/tobacco, marijuana, and cocaine, and more likely to carry weapons and consider suicide. Study results may allow school officials, parents, researchers, and health care providers to gain a better understanding of inhalant use among students at risk for dropping out of school, a group which has not been extensively studied by previous researchers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-495
Number of pages19
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Alternative schools
  • Inhalant use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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