Limb segment vibration modulates spinal reflex excitability and muscle mRNA expression after spinal cord injury

Shuo Hsiu Chang, Shih Chiao Tseng, Colleen L. McHenry, Andrew E. Littmann, Manish Suneja, Richard K. Shields

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We investigated the effect of various doses of vertical oscillation (vibration) on soleus H-reflex amplitude and post-activation depression in individuals with and without SCI. We also explored the acute effect of short-term limb vibration on skeletal muscle mRNA expression of genes associated with spinal plasticity. Methods: Six healthy adults and five chronic complete SCI subjects received vibratory stimulation of their tibia over three different gravitational accelerations (0.3. g, 0.6. g, and 1.2. g) at a fixed frequency (30. Hz). Soleus H-reflexes were measured before, during, and after vibration. Two additional chronic complete SCI subjects had soleus muscle biopsies 3. h following a single bout of vibration. Results: H-reflex amplitude was depressed over 83% in both groups during vibration. This vibratory-induced inhibition lasted over 2. min in the control group, but not in the SCI group. Post-activation depression was modulated during the long-lasting vibratory inhibition. A single bout of mechanical oscillation altered mRNA expression from selected genes associated with synaptic plasticity. Conclusions: Vibration of the lower leg inhibits the H-reflex amplitude, influences post-activation depression, and alters skeletal muscle mRNA expression of genes associated with synaptic plasticity. Significance: Limb segment vibration may offer a long term method to reduce spinal reflex excitability after SCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-568
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume123
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mechanical oscillation
  • Paralysis
  • Post-activation depression
  • Spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sensory Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

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