Literature and medicine

Contributions to clinical practice

Rita Charon, Joanne Trautmann Banks, Julia E. Connelly, Anne Hunsaker Hawkins, Kathryn Montgomery Hunter, Anne Jones, Martha Montello, Suzanne Poirer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

202 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-606
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume122
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 1995

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Medicine
Physicians
Narration
Drama
Poetry
Medical Education
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Reward
Teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Charon, R., Banks, J. T., Connelly, J. E., Hawkins, A. H., Hunter, K. M., Jones, A., ... Poirer, S. (1995). Literature and medicine: Contributions to clinical practice. Annals of Internal Medicine, 122(8), 599-606. https://doi.org/10.7326/0003-4819-122-8-199504150-00008

Literature and medicine : Contributions to clinical practice. / Charon, Rita; Banks, Joanne Trautmann; Connelly, Julia E.; Hawkins, Anne Hunsaker; Hunter, Kathryn Montgomery; Jones, Anne; Montello, Martha; Poirer, Suzanne.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 122, No. 8, 15.04.1995, p. 599-606.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Charon, R, Banks, JT, Connelly, JE, Hawkins, AH, Hunter, KM, Jones, A, Montello, M & Poirer, S 1995, 'Literature and medicine: Contributions to clinical practice', Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 122, no. 8, pp. 599-606. https://doi.org/10.7326/0003-4819-122-8-199504150-00008
Charon, Rita ; Banks, Joanne Trautmann ; Connelly, Julia E. ; Hawkins, Anne Hunsaker ; Hunter, Kathryn Montgomery ; Jones, Anne ; Montello, Martha ; Poirer, Suzanne. / Literature and medicine : Contributions to clinical practice. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1995 ; Vol. 122, No. 8. pp. 599-606.
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