Local micromechanical properties of decellularized lung scaffolds measured with atomic force microscopy

T. Luque, E. Melo, E. Garreta, Joaquin Cortiella, Joan Nichols, R. Farré, D. Navajas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bioartificial lungs re-engineered from decellularized organ scaffolds are a promising alternative to lung transplantation. Critical features for improving scaffold repopulation depend on the mechanical properties of the cell microenvironment. However, the mechanics of the lung extracellular matrix (ECM) is poorly defined. The local mechanical properties of the ECM were measured in different regions of decellularized rat lung scaffolds with atomic force microscopy. Lungs excised from rats (n = 11) were decellularized with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cut into ∼7 μm thick slices. The complex elastic modulus (GL) of lung ECM was measured over a frequency band ranging from 0.1 to 11.45 Hz. Measurements were taken in alveolar wall segments, alveolar wall junctions and pleural regions. The storage modulus (G′, real part of GL) of alveolar ECM was ∼6 kPa, showing small changes between wall segments and junctions. Pleural regions were threefold stiffer than alveolar walls. G′ of alveolar walls and pleura increased with frequency as a weak power law with exponent 0.05. The loss modulus (G″, imaginary part of GL) was 10-fold lower and showed a frequency dependence similar to that of G′ at low frequencies (0.1-1 Hz), but increased more markedly at higher frequencies. Local differences in mechanical properties and topology of the parenchymal site could be relevant mechanical cues for regulating the spatial distribution, differentiation and function of lung cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6852-6859
Number of pages8
JournalActa Biomaterialia
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Atomic Force Microscopy
Scaffolds
Atomic force microscopy
Lung
Extracellular Matrix
Mechanical properties
Rats
Elastic moduli
Sodium dodecyl sulfate
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Spatial distribution
Frequency bands
Cellular Microenvironment
Mechanics
Lung Transplantation
Pleura
Elastic Modulus
Topology
Cues

Keywords

  • Alveolar mechanics
  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Bioengineered lungs
  • Biological scaffolds
  • Extracellular matrix mechanics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Local micromechanical properties of decellularized lung scaffolds measured with atomic force microscopy. / Luque, T.; Melo, E.; Garreta, E.; Cortiella, Joaquin; Nichols, Joan; Farré, R.; Navajas, D.

In: Acta Biomaterialia, Vol. 9, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 6852-6859.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Luque, T. ; Melo, E. ; Garreta, E. ; Cortiella, Joaquin ; Nichols, Joan ; Farré, R. ; Navajas, D. / Local micromechanical properties of decellularized lung scaffolds measured with atomic force microscopy. In: Acta Biomaterialia. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 6. pp. 6852-6859.
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