Long-lasting stability of Vaccinia virus strains in murine feces

implications for virus circulation and environmental maintenance.

Jônatas S. Abrahão, Giliane de Souza Trindade, Jaqueline M.Siqueira Ferreira, Rafael Kroon Campos, Cláudio A. Bonjardim, Paulo C.Peregrino Ferreira, Erna Geessien Kroon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vaccinia virus (VACV) has been associated with several bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil, causing exanthematic lesions in dairy cattle and humans. The way that VACV circulates in the environment is unknown, as is the way that this virus is transferred from wildlife to farms. Rodents are hypothetical VACV reservoirs, and murine feces has been identified as a potential source of viral shedding and transmission. In this work, we analyzed the stability of VACV infectious particles and DNA in feces from intranasally infected mice, exposed to environmental temperature and humidity, by titration assays and PCR, respectively. The results showed that VACV infectious particles were still detected at 20 days post-environmental-exposure (d.p.e.), while viral DNA was detected until 60 d.p.e. A gradual decrease in fecal viral load could be detected in all analyzed VACV strains. This work indicates long-lasting stability of VACV in murine feces and reinforces the idea that fecal matter may represent a potential source of circulating virus among rodents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1551-1553
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of virology
Volume154
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Vaccinia virus
Feces
Maintenance
Viruses
Environmental Exposure
Virion
Rodentia
Virus Shedding
Vaccinia
Viral DNA
Humidity
Viral Load
Disease Outbreaks
Brazil
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Temperature
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

Cite this

Abrahão, J. S., Trindade, G. D. S., Ferreira, J. M. S., Kroon Campos, R., Bonjardim, C. A., Ferreira, P. C. P., & Kroon, E. G. (2009). Long-lasting stability of Vaccinia virus strains in murine feces: implications for virus circulation and environmental maintenance. Archives of virology, 154(9), 1551-1553. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00705-009-0470-1

Long-lasting stability of Vaccinia virus strains in murine feces : implications for virus circulation and environmental maintenance. / Abrahão, Jônatas S.; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Ferreira, Jaqueline M.Siqueira; Kroon Campos, Rafael; Bonjardim, Cláudio A.; Ferreira, Paulo C.Peregrino; Kroon, Erna Geessien.

In: Archives of virology, Vol. 154, No. 9, 01.01.2009, p. 1551-1553.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abrahão, Jônatas S. ; Trindade, Giliane de Souza ; Ferreira, Jaqueline M.Siqueira ; Kroon Campos, Rafael ; Bonjardim, Cláudio A. ; Ferreira, Paulo C.Peregrino ; Kroon, Erna Geessien. / Long-lasting stability of Vaccinia virus strains in murine feces : implications for virus circulation and environmental maintenance. In: Archives of virology. 2009 ; Vol. 154, No. 9. pp. 1551-1553.
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