Long-Range Communication Network in the Type 1B Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor

Wilfredo Evangelista, John C. Lee, Lee Chuan C Yeh, Aleksandra Gmyrek, James Lee

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Protein-protein interactions are recognized as a fundamental phenomenon that is intimately associated with biological functions and thus are ideal targets for developing modulators for regulating biological functions. A challenge is to identify a site that is situated away from but functionally connected to the protein-protein interface. We employed bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their receptors as a model system to develop a strategy for identifying such a network of communication. Accordingly, using computational analyses with the COREX/BEST algorithm, we uncovered an overall pattern connecting various regions of BMPR-1B ectodomain, including the four conserved residues in the protein-protein interface. In preparation for testing the long-range effects of mutations of distal residues for future studies, we examined the extent of measurable perturbation of the four conserved residues by determination of the conformation and relative affinities of these BMPR-1B mutants for ligands BMP-2, -6, and -7 and GDF-5. Results suggest no significant structural changes in the receptor but do suggest that the four residues play different roles in defining ligand affinity and both intra- and intermolecular interactions play a role in defining ligand affinity. Thus, these results established two primary but necessary goals: (1) the baseline knowledge of perturbation of conserved interfacial residues for future reference and (2) the ability of the computational approach to identify the distal residues connecting to the interfacial residues. The data presented here provide the foundation for future experiments to identify the effects of distal residues that affect the specificity and affinity of BMP recognition. Protein-protein interactions are integral reactions in essentially all biological activities such as gene regulation and age-related development. Often, diseases are consequences of the alteration of these intermacromolecular interactions, which are thus recognized as a legitimate target for developing modulators for regulating biological functions. One approach is to design ligands that bind to the protein-protein interface. Another is to identify an allosteric site, an advantage of which is bypassing the potential challenge in competing for high-affinity interfacial interactions or a specific interface in a superassembly of multiple macromolecules. However, a challenge of this approach is identifying a site that is situated away from but functionally connected to the protein-protein interface.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)7079-7088
    Number of pages10
    JournalBiochemistry
    Volume54
    Issue number48
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 8 2015

    Fingerprint

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors
    Telecommunication networks
    Proteins
    Ligands
    Modulators
    Growth Differentiation Factor 5
    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 6
    Allosteric Site
    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2
    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins
    Bioactivity
    Macromolecules
    Gene expression

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry
    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Evangelista, W., Lee, J. C., Yeh, L. C. C., Gmyrek, A., & Lee, J. (2015). Long-Range Communication Network in the Type 1B Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor. Biochemistry, 54(48), 7079-7088. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.biochem.5b00955

    Long-Range Communication Network in the Type 1B Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor. / Evangelista, Wilfredo; Lee, John C.; Yeh, Lee Chuan C; Gmyrek, Aleksandra; Lee, James.

    In: Biochemistry, Vol. 54, No. 48, 08.12.2015, p. 7079-7088.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Evangelista, W, Lee, JC, Yeh, LCC, Gmyrek, A & Lee, J 2015, 'Long-Range Communication Network in the Type 1B Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor', Biochemistry, vol. 54, no. 48, pp. 7079-7088. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.biochem.5b00955
    Evangelista, Wilfredo ; Lee, John C. ; Yeh, Lee Chuan C ; Gmyrek, Aleksandra ; Lee, James. / Long-Range Communication Network in the Type 1B Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor. In: Biochemistry. 2015 ; Vol. 54, No. 48. pp. 7079-7088.
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