Long-term hantavirus persistence in rodent populations in central Arizona

Ken D. Abbott, Thomas Ksiazek, James N. Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For 35 months, we monitored hantavirus activity in rodent populations in central Arizona. The most frequently captured hantavirus antibody-positive rodents were Peromyscus boylii and P. truei. Antibody-positive P. boylii were more frequently male (84%), older, and heavier, and they survived longer on trapping web sites than antibody-negative mice. The number of antibody- positive P. boylii was greater during high population densities than during low densities, while antibody prevalence was greater during low population densities. Virus transmission and incidence rates, also related to population densities, varied by trapping site. The spatial distribution of antibody- positive P. boylii varied by population density and reflected the species preference for dense chaparral habitats. The focal ranges of antibody- positive P. boylii also demonstrated a patchy distribution of hantavirus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-112
Number of pages11
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Hantavirus
Rodentia
Population Density
Antibodies
Population
Peromyscus
Ecosystem
Viruses
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Long-term hantavirus persistence in rodent populations in central Arizona. / Abbott, Ken D.; Ksiazek, Thomas; Mills, James N.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1999, p. 102-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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